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COL. WILLIAM CRAWFORD SMITH, 

COMMANDING THE FIRST TENNESSEE UNTIL HIS DEATH AT MANILA. FEBRUARY 5, 1899. 



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FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT 



UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



COMPILED BY 



■■ THE TENNESSEE REGIMENT HAS DONE SOME GOOD FIGHTING. AND SHOULD 
YOU PLACE THEM ON SHORE. WILL TAKE THE CITY OF ILOILO WITHOUT ASSIST- 
ANCEiFROM ARTILLERY OR GUNBOATS. '~ Gen. Otis to Gen. Miller. 



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PRESS or 

MARSHALL i BRUCE COMPANY 










THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT 



UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS 



BEGIXXIXO OF THE j: 

SPAXISH-AMERICAX TN'AJR f ! 



CHE Anglo-Saxon stands, and for centuries has 
stood, foremost for liberty, for the equality 
of men before the law. and for the fullest 
freedom of thought and intellectual advance- 
ment. As a result, the march of the race has never 
been in retreat, but ever onward. It has made blun- 
ders, but it can learn a lesson, seldom committing 
the blunder over and over until it becomes a crime. 
These conditions are reversed in Spain. That 
country is by nature endowed with many advan- 
tages, and yet her people are wofully down-trodden, 
and generally ignorant. She has made the serious 
mistake for long generations of trying to hold dis- 
tant colonies by force of arms instead of endeavoring 
to bring about their contentment and prosperity. 
Her dealing with Cuba is an instance of her fatuous 
and monumental stupidity. If we entirely ignore her 
attitude relative to the moral and intellectual devel- 
opment of the Cubans, a study of the statistics of 
the exactments to which they have been subjected. 
shows the iniquity and avarice of the mother coun- 
try and amply justifies the Cubans for their Inng com- 
tinued struggle to free themselves from her grasp 
— £. struggle seriously begim in the first of their 
great revolutions in 18()8, and ending successfully, 
through the Samaritan efforts of the United State.?, 
thirty years later in the second revolt. 

In the mind of the American people, the event 
which caused hostilities between this country and 
Spain was the destruction, on February 15, 1898, of 
the United States battleship Maiiir in Havana har- 
bor: but the war had been coming for some time be- 
fore that incident. The cruelties of the Spanish 
authorities toward the Cubans, hardly precedented 
except in the history of Spain toward the helpless 
peoples who have fallen imder her power: the impo 
tency exhibited by the dons in their efforts to subdue 
them; and the continued menace to our interests 
which this long drawn out contest brought about — 
these things inspired various resolutions in Congres.3 
looking to armed intervention. Even if the Mniiii had 
not been destroyed the war would undoulitedly have 
materialized. The leport of the naval court ap- 
pointed for the purpose of inquiring into the cause of 



the catastrophe, finding that the ship had been de- 
stroyed by the explosion of a mine — seeming to 
throw the responsibility for the crime on the Spanish 
government — merely hastened the conflict. 

The war spirit after the report became general. 
"Remember the Maine'." was the slogan. Paity lines 
were erased, and the people as one man were for 
war. On April 3, 1898. Consul General Fitzhugh Lee 
was ordered home from Havana, and to bring with 
him all American citizens in the Cuban capital. Pres- 
ident McKinley sent his long expected message to 
Congress, asking authority to take measures to se- 
cure the termination of hostilities in Cuba, to secure 
in the island the establishment of a stable govern- 
ment, and to use the military and naval forces of the 
United States as might be necessary to carry out his 
policy. Congress acted promptly, voting a large sum 
to carry out the proposed measures. In anticipation 
of the war, the regular army was ordered to mobilize 
at Tampa, Mobile. New Orleans, and Chickamauga. 
Gen. Woodford, the American minister to Spain, was 
given his passports by the Spanish government. And 
on April 22 the American fleet under Admiral Samp- 
son sailed from Key West to effect a blockade of 
Havana and the northern coast of Cuba. Then 
came the President's ultimatum to Spain, demanding 
a reply on or before noon of Saturday, April 23, and 
a few days afterward his proclamation calling for 
120,000 troops. On a joint resolution passing through 
both Houses of Congress, on April 25, it was signed 
by President McKinley, and war was formally de- 
clared, although four days previously the first 
shotted gun was fired, throwing a shell from t'le Uni- 
ted States gunboat Niis-hville across the bow of the 
Spanish steamer Biiriin yriitiini, the first prize taken 
by our blockading fleet. 






RESPONSE OF THE VOLUNTEERS S 



ff ■ HEN President .lames K. Polk, at the out- 
■ M I break of the war with Mexico, called for 
^^^J volunteers, more than 300.000 men re- 
■^ '^ spondeci at once. The response to Presi- 
dent McKinleys proclamation was as prompt and en- 
thusiastic. The people were not a little moved by 
sentiment — the desire to avenge the execution of 



(5) 




COL GRACEY CHILDERS. 

APPOINTED COLONEL OF THE FIRST TENNESSEE. TO SUCCEED COL. W C SMITH. 



THK FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VUH'NTEERS. 



Crittenden anrl the slaughter of the crew ot the ill- 
fated Virginius. anri to put an end to the starving 
of noncombating Cuban women and children: but 
over and above all surged the resolution to punish 
Spain for the insult offered to the stars and stripes 
on Febi-uary 15. 1898. Then there was obliterated 
the imaginary line between North and South; sons 
of the Lost Cause and of the Union were actuated 
by the same high patriotism, and it could then be 
truthfully sung: 

" There is a cry tliut rises and swells ou every breeze— 
Xo Ifijjgards on the shore and no laggards on the seas ; 
From homes of Lee and Lincoln the patriot souls are seen— 
Thank God: the hind's united, the old flag waves serene' " 

And Tennessee? As had been her course since her 
admission into the Union in 1796, she showed by her 
enthusiasm her indorsement of the sentiment — "Our 
country, may she a-ways be right: but — our country, 
right or wrong!' All the States promised their quota 
of troops, btit even as early as April 20, this tele- 
gram was sent to the papers from Washington, prov- 
ing once more Tennessee's right to be called the 
Volunteer State: 

WA-iiuxGTo.v, April 20. — All day to-day letters and 
telegrams have been pouring in upon Secretary of 
War Alger from prominent citizens of Tennessee, 
offering their services in the event of war. Similar 
telegrams have been received by the Tennessee del- 
egation, which were duly forwarded to the war de- 
partment. So far more offers have been received 
from Tennessee than from any other State in the 
Union. 

Under the first call for volunteers Tennessee's 
quota was to be three regiments of infantry. The 
officers of the First were: 

Colonel — Wm. Crawford Smith. 

Lieutenant Colonel — Gracey Childers. 

Ma.1ors — Albert B. Bayless. B. Frank Cheatham, 
and John G. Maguire. 

Major and Surgeon — Richard A. Barr. 

Captain and Assistant Surgeon — R. M. Kirby- 
Smith and Percy Jones 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant — James K. Polk. 

First Lieutenant and Quartermaster — Andrew J. 
Duncan. 

Captain and Chaplain — Lewis J. Lelaud. 

The field officers of the Second were: 

Colonel — Kellar Anderson. 

Lieutenant Colonel — Thomas E. Patterson. 

Majors — Frank H. Deffrey. Mark A. Walker, and 
George W. Seay. 

Those of the Third were: 

Colonel — James P. Fyffe. 

Lieutenant Colonel — Daniel M. Coffman. 

Majors — William Brown. James W. Meeks. and 
Edwin C. Ramage. 

Under the second call a fourth regiment was or 
ganized, with the following field officers: 

Colonel — George LeRoy Brown. 

Lieutenant Colonel — Harvey H. Hannah. 

Majors — William C. Tatom, William O. Vertree-,. 
and J. Crum Epier. 

Two of the reg:menis — the Second and Third — 



were discharged Ijefore they saw active service in 
the field, and the Fourth was quartered awhile in 
Cuba, then discharged. While they were not per- 
mitted to take part in any of the battles between 
this country and Spain, or between our forces and 
the Filipinos, the soldiers were ready to fight like 
Tennesseans. and would have refiected glory on 
American arms. 

The First Tennessee Regiment was the earliest 
organized, the companies constituting it being Com- 
pany A, Nashville: Company B, Columbia; Company 
C, Nashville: Company D. Lawrenceburg; Company 
E. Nashville: Company F. Nashville: Company G, 
Waverly: Company H. Clarksville: Company I. Big 
Sandy: Company K. Springfield; and Companies L 
and M to be recruited from Nashville. On April 23 
the National State Guard was ordered out. the order 
from Adjutant Charles Sykes being addressed to the 
various commanders throughout the State, and to 
those of the First Regiment. It was made in antici- 
pation of the President's call. The troops were to 
rendezvous at Nashville preparatory to being mus- 
tered into the service by Lieut. Samuel Seay. of the 
Fourteenth United States Infantry. There was bus- 
tle and excitement and enthusiasm then for weeks 
in the capital city. The regular troops were passing 
daily on the trains; the volunteers along the various 
thoroughfares recalled to mind the stirring days of 
1861. and patriotism could almost be felt in the air! 

At length the companies were fl'.led. and the Ten- 
nessee troops repaired to camps outside the city 
limits to be drilled and to await orders to march to 
the front. The waiting to these heroic boys proved a 
sore trial, for they enlisted to fight and not to rest 
idl> in camp. Even the Governor of the State, Hon. 
Robert L. Taylor, became inspired by the war spirit, 
and the volunteers expressed a desire that he snould 
command them. 

The Daughters of the American Revolution, 
through Mrs. E. C. Lewis, on May 17, 1898, presented 
the First Tennessee with a flag, and soon after the 
regiment repaired to Cherokee Park to await further 
orders. 



i ORDERED TO SAN FRANCISCO « 

CHE order to move came in due time. Familiar 
scenes were to be forsaken, and the old blue 
skies of Tennessee were to be looked upon no 
more for months. In all this, despite their 
ardor, the Tennesseans found a trial, for it is no 
insignificant matter to clasp the hands of friends in 
farewell, perhaps for the last time, and to reflect 
thai in distant climes there would be lacking the 
ti lu'h of mother's, wife's, or sister's tender palm and 
th. love-light from loving eyes. On June 10 they 
folded their tents, and after an uneventful journey 
reached San Francisco, going into quarters at Camp 



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THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VULINTEERS. 



Merritt. Their reception at San Francisco was grat- 
ifying in the extreme. 

Camp Merritt proved an unhealthful place, how- 
ever. There was an increase of mild cases of bron- 
chitis and other maladies which were hard to fight 
on account of the foggy nights. 

As many of the Tennessee troops had surmised 
and predicted, it was found necessary to secure bet- 
ter quarters. Camp Merriam. in a beautiful valley 
of the Presidio, was selected. The climatic change 
was at once seen to be beneficial. In a short while 
the sick list fell off nearly fifty per cent. 

The citizens continued their good offices, and ev- 
erything glided smoothly with the exception of a few 
acts by unruly soldiers, who. however, redeemed any 
mttake they made, by their valor in tne Philippines. 

Orders were received more than once for the First 
Tennessee to proceed to Manila, but were as often 
reconsidered. Homesickness began to take posses- 
sion of many of the soldiers. As one of the officers 
said, "they wanted Manila or home." It seemed that 
they were not to take any real part in the war — were 
not to taste any of the excitement of conflict, or to 
gain any of the glory of victory, not reflecting that 
those also serve who only stand and wait. They 
were Tennesseans — and the record of tne Tennessee 
soldier is that when there is any fighting to do. he 
wants to take part in it. 

Time had developed the fact that there were mem- 
bers of the regiment who were immature, physically 
disabled, and undesirable for other reasons, and in 
October an order came from Washington to have 
them discharged. After an inspection made by Maj. 
Fields. 174 men were given discharges. 

Ii! the meantime, as stated, a number of the sol- 
diers had died in camp — none the less heroes be- 
cause they did not fall in line of battle. 

'• Kot alone is duty iloue. 
Not jilotie is glory won 

Where the storm or b.-ittle rages. 
Names of those who. waiting- died — 
Fame will write them in just pride 
Oo the tablets of the ages." 



the command of Lieut. Col. Gracey Childevs. The 
wives of Chief Surgeon Richard Barr and Chaplain 
L. J. Leland were, by special permission ol the Sec- 
retary of War, allowed to accompany their husbands. 
Thousands of the citizens of San Francisco vvere on 
the dock to bid them good-bye and in this token of 
the esteem of the populace they forgot the harsh 
things said aboui them by the papers. They arrived 
at Manila, in the Philippine Islands, November 28, 
ISHS. 



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^ ON THE WAY TO MANILA 



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'J'J M HILE some of the San Francisco papers be- 
/ ■ I came unfriendly toward the soldiers so- 
^^^1 journing there, on account of the scare 
■^ "^ they gave a coast negro — nursing their 
wrath to keep it warm until the moment when the 
country's defenders began leaving for Manila — the 
latter were not without a host of friends and well- 
wishers. A portion of the First Regiment left on the 
Zriihiiiilii; on the evening of October 30, for Manila, 
The companies which embarked were A, B, C, E, K, 
L, and M, comprising 590 men and ofllcers. The 
remaining four companies — mostly new recruits — 
followed one week later on the ''//// nf finhln. under 






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t A GLANCE AT THE PHILIPPINES 






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CHE number of islands in the archipelago is 
variously estimated at from 600 to 2,000. If 
the Carolines and the Ladrone Islands are not 
counted with the Philippines proper, however, 
there are probably about 1,200, The more important 
are Luzon, having 41,000 square miles: Mindaneo, 
37,000: Samar, 5,300: Panay, 4,600: Palawan, 4.150: 
Mindoro, 4.050: Leyte. 3.090: Negros. 2,300; Cebu, 
1.650, and Mashbate. 1.315. 

The Filipinos first appeared in history in 1509, 
but the islands were not discovered till 1521. The 
conquest of the islands was accomplished by a few 
Spaniards in the sixteenth century, and was held 
by them until turned over to the United States in 
1S99. 

The natives were driven into an insurrection in 
1S96 on account of the rapacity of the monks, and 
the revolt was directed as much against them as the 
Spanish government. Rents were raised so that the 
small farmers could not pay: they rebelled, and for 
the first time rich and poor, educated and ignorant, 
united in the common struggle against Spain. Their 
leader was Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy, who has 
been giving tne Americans so much trouble. 

The war between the Filipinos and Spaniards had 
been interrupted by the agreement of the Spanish 
government with Aguinaldo and other insurgent 
leaders to pay them $800,000. and introduce all the 
reforms for which the Filipinos had been asking. C £ 
this money, ,$400,000 was paid into a bank in Hong 
Kcng. The insurgents considered it a trust fund to 
be held as a guaranty of Spanish good faith. Agui- 
naldo began a new insurrection soon, as the Spanish 
government failed to fulfill its promises. Nine thou- 
sand Spanish prisoners were held by his forces, and 
an army of 30,000 declared to be under arms. He 
claimed, even after the Americans had taken Manila, 
that he was the de facto ruler of the country, and 
interfered considerably in the administration of af- 
fairs there. Complications arose, and it was soon 
seen by those in a position to see that trouble was 
brtwing between the Americans and the insurgents. 
The expected outbreak occurred on the night ot Sat- 
urday. February 4, 1899, at Manila. Three- venture- 




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THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT. UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



11 



seme Filipinos ran past tlie pickets of the F.rst Ne 
braska Volunteers, at Santa IVIesa. They were ;h-.il- 
lenged. and retired without replying. Once more 
they tried the experiment, and were challenged and 
thrust back beyond the picket line. For the third 
time they approached the picket line maintained by 
the Americans. Corporal Greely challenged them, 
and then opened fire, killing one and wounding 
another, 'this was the signal for the first battle be 
tween the Americans and Filipinos — a conflict which 
the Tennesseans foreshadowed some time before in 
letters to friends at home. 



I PRECEDING FIRST BATTLE 



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.WITH FILIPINOS... 



BEFORE referring further to the first engage- 
ment between the Americans and Filipinos, 
a glance at the movements of the First Ten- 
nessee after its arrival in the Philippines 
will be given. 

There have been expressions to the effect that the 
Tennesseans have done nothing in this war worthy 
of record — an erroneous idea, certainly, having its 
inspiration in the execrable trait of humanity which 
gave rise to the scriptural maxim that a prophet is 
not without honor save in his own country. If we 
had no other proof of their gallantry, it would be 
sufSciently proved by the letter written by Gen. 
Otis in their praise. This letter was written Febru- 
ary 11, 1S99, to Gen. Miller, off Iloilo, and from it is 
taken this significant extract: 

The Tennessee Regiment has done some good fight- 
ing, and, should you place them on shore, will tak; 
the city of Iloilo without assistance from artillery 
or gunboats. They go down with enthusiasm gained 
here (at Manila) on the battle line, where they 
fought desperately. 

No greater tribute could be tendered. No greater 
confidence could have been shown the picked marks- 
men at King's Mountain, the soldiers under Jackson 
at Horseshoe Bend, or the troops who stormed and 
carried the City of Mexico a halt c. ntury ago. 

And while on this subject of dauntless intrepidity, 
we should not overlook two or three instances of 
individual courage happening during the war, which 
were topics for the whole people at the time of their 
occurrence. One was outlined in a cablegram from 
Manila. 'Near Jaro," it read. "Sergeant Clement C. 
Jones, of the Third Battalion, Tennessee Regiment, 
made a dash from the outposts across eight hun- 
dreds yards of open rice fields, forded a river, seized 
a rebel standard, and returned unscathed with his 
trophy, through a hail of Mauser bullets from the Fil- 
ipino intrenchmenls." Collier's Weekly, giving an 
illustration of the thrilling act, declares that it was 
the most desperate deed of daring the war has pro- 



duced. Anothei- v.as duiing a skirmish in Stpttmber. 
rear Naga, Island of Cebu, where Lewis Dorris dis- 
played laudalde hei'oism. The incident is bcSt given 
in the language of Logan Williams, a Tennessee sol- 
dier: 

• We all marched up into the town," he wrote in 
a private letter, tne place mentioned being Maurl- 
baurl. 'Finding it deserted, we put out our seniiiieis 
ana spent the night in a convent. At iU o'clock next 
morning four shots were heard, and our native sol- 
diers reported the insurgents advancing on the town. 
In a few moments we had on our equipment, and were 
advancing in the direction of the shots, our lighting 
foice being Zl Americans and about 100 natives. 7 
oi. the latter being armed with American-made guns, 
the rest with spears. 

"When we had gone but a short distance from 
quarters, the captain ordered me to take one man 
and guard quarters. I had spent haraly two hours 
keeping men, weeping women and chiidien out of 
quarters when here came our boys hacK, and to my 
surprise and horror the detachment was headed by 
four men carrying a stretcher with an American 
sckiier cold in ueath. Then came another stretcner 
bearing a wounded man shot through the stomach. 
Then came a second corpse, my fiiend Adams, with 
a horrible gaze out of his half-opened eyes, showing 
h-; had died hard. Then a native latally woanded 
and five men slightly wounded. Then another of our 
boys slightly wounded, another with his canteen shot 
to pieces, and still another with iiis bayonet bent 
witn a bullet. Last of all came my old friend, Lewis 
Dorris, bent down imder seven guns and three p.iirs 
of bloody sidearms. He explained it all to me. 

"They advanced along a road running paral.el with 
the bay, built on an embankment some eight feet 
high, with water on both sides at high tide. About 
a mile down the road the water ceases on the land- 
ward side of the road and a bluff tmrty feet high 
rises, on the top of which the insurgents had their 
fort, built of rock, almost over the road. 

•■ThL= boys advanced, tiring into this, but re.eived 
no return Are, and had gotten right under it, intend- 
ing to climb up and take it, when a perfect shower 
of stones, bullets, and other missiles came from two 
cai;uon planted at each end and from the Remingtons 
and Mausers, killing one man and wounding half a 
dci.en more. 

"Capt. Walker, cool and deliberate, ordered the 
men to give it to them, but finding his fire ineffect- 
ive and tliat longer delay meant the de.ith of per- 
haps his whole force, ordered retreat. However, one 
man was killed and several wounded befor.^ shelter 
was gained. 

"In the midst of the most trying time and most 
galling fire, Lewis Dorris, one of our N.ishville boys, 
jumped down the bank, after retreat had been or- 
dered, and, taking hold of one of his fallen comrades, 
stood calling for assistance. And, by the way of pa- 
renthesis, will say, he will come home a corporal, 
promoted for bravery on the field." 

Before a month had passed after the arrival of 
Col. Smith and his Tennessee regiment at Manila, 
that officer began attracting the attention of his 
superiors. He was accordingly advanced by Gen. 
Otis to an independent command. He was assigned 
to the comiuiind of Cavite, and of all the troops sta- 
tor.ed there. 

Writing to Maj. E. C Lewis, of Nashville, under 
date of January 12, 1899, he said: 

"I have one of the battalion.-; (Cheatham si from 




I 



MAJ. B. FRANK CHEATHAM. 

NOW SENIOR MAJOR THIRTY-SEVENTH U. S V. 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE RE(3IMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



13 



my own regiment, the battalion of the x'lrst Califor- 
nia Heavy Artillery, the Wyoming battalion of infan- 
try. Troop A. of the Nevada cavalry, and Battery A. 
of the Wyoming Light Artillery, including my head- 
quarters' staff and iiand- in all about 1.300 men. and. 
still being in command of the First and Third B.ittal- 
ions of my own regiment at Manila, tnis makes about 
1,950 men I have to look after. Lieut. Col. Childers is 
in immediate command of the First and Third Bat- 
talions, which are reported, of course, from my 
headquarters as detached and stationed at Manila. " 

Col. Smith was ordered to Cavite to relieve Col. 
D. D. Van Valzau. of the Eighteenth Unitea States 
Infantry, who was designated for service in another 
section of the Philippine Islands. Cavite. to be spe- 
cific, is eight miles from Manila across the bay, or 
twenty miles around by land. 

The soldiers were not idle from their arrival. It 
was claimed that the members of the First had been 
kept largely in the rear, to restore order in the terri- 
tory taken by our troops, out this is a mistake. Lieut. 
James K. Polk is authority for the correction, and he 
also says that they had not done any police duty up 
to June 23, 1899. "The regiment." he stated In a com- 
munication to the Nashville American, "has done 
outpost duty continuously, each company being on 
such duty from once in two days to once in four 
days. These outposts are located along the Jaro 
river on one side, and between Iloilo river and the 
bay on the other. Along the lines we have built 
small blockhouses to protect the men from the 
weather and bullets, and for the first two months 
after we reached Manila, scarcely a day passed in 
which there were not small outpost skirmishes." 

Circumstances and opportunities bring out the 
best qualities of soldier and civilian. Dewey had 
long been in the navy; it required the war with 
Spain to show that he was a bulldog fighter. Lee 
had been for years in the army: it needed the exi- 
gencies of a great conflict to prove that he was the 
leading general of his time. If circumstances had 
not Intervened, neither of these heroes would have 
won his reputation. So with the First Tennes- 
see. Placed at the front, in the storm of shot and 
shell, it would have been heralded from the begin- 
ning of hostilities and made as famous as any regi- 
ment in the battles around Santiago. 

As shown, they were kept at Nashville and San 
Francisco for something near half a year. Arriving 
at Manila, weeks passed before they were given an 
opportunity to show their fighting qualities. Of 
course no criticism should be made relative to the 
forced inactivity of the regiment — the only Southern 
regiment in the Philippines, by the way. Gen. Otis 
was supposed to know his duty. It was plain enough, 
however, that "the boys ' were not underestimated, 
even by the general himself. His actions toward 
Col. Smith, as well as his letter to Gen. Miller, men- 
tioned elsewhere, abundantly prove this. 

But a time was approaching when the soldiers 
could show their spirit and receive the eulogy of the 
public. 

This was first demonstrated at Manila, in the at- 
tack made by the Filipinos. 




mENTION has been made of the opening 
clash between the Americans and insur- 
gents on February 4. 1899. 
The continuous battles around Manila 
were furious and bloody, the loss to the enemy being 
several thousand. 

All the reports of any length testified to the des- 
perate bravery exhibited by the First Tennessee. 
The regiment simply covered itself with glory. The 
Second Battalion. Col. Smith and staff, had been or- 
dered liack from Cavite only a few days before, 
dcubtless in anticipation of some kind of trouble. 
Perhaps a better idea of the conflict and the part the 
Tennessee troops took can be given by quoting from 
the letters of eye-witnesses. In a communication 
to the Banner, Lieut. Winston Pilcher says: 

"Sunday night. Lieut. Col. Childers and Maj. Ma- 
guire came in on a run from the city, and said there 
waf firing on the outposts out on the waterworks 
road, where the Nebraskans were. About that time 
ail aide dashed up. and in about two minutes Chief 
Bugler Embry was sounding 'To arms!' The men 
gave a wild yell of delight, and rushed into their 
ti-nts after arms. The regiment formed in the San 
Lucia road and waited for orders, and I, with thirty 
men, was left to guard the rag boxes and tents. 
Presently the regiment moved off, and I made an 
oration to the stars! All night long I stood out on 
the river front and listened. The sound of firing 
cyme in fiom every point except the bay. And it 
came from there, too, for the Monadnock and the 
Charleston were shelling the woods. I am not out 
or a still hunt for a hero's death, but I wanted to be 
with the regiment, 

"About 6 o'clock Sunday morning the regiment 
came plodding back, and every individual man was 
saying something that was not nice! They had been 
marched to the other side of the walled city, and had 
stayed there all night. At 8 o'clock I was relieved, and 
as I was going toward my tent (the firing had never 
ceased) I met an aide. To my query. 'What news?' 
h»i said: 'I'm going to send your Second Battalion to 
help out the Nebraskans.' I broke into a run, and 
bj the time the order to get ready came the battalion 
was ready to march, and the First and luird tearing 
their hair. 

"Manila is a much larger city than I thought. We 
marched five miles, and were still in town. As we 
passed the various barracks, those left behind yelled, 
'Give 'em h — 1 for us, boys!' We were nearly out of 
the city, and were standing in columns of fours, 
when we heard our first Mausers. About a peck of 
them ripped through a bamboo hedge and — well, no 
living being can know what they sounded like unless 
he could hear them coming. It is demoralizing. 

"What we halted for was not long in coming. An 
artillery oflicer dashed back and ordered up the litter 
bearers, saying the colonel was killed. I did not 
know Colonel Smith was with us, and when I ran to 
th(> front of the column and saw the gallant old gen- 
tl( man lying in the road, I was horribly shocked. 
Adjutant Polk, Maj. Cheatham, and Surgeon Kirby- 
Smith were bending over him. He had fallen just 
as he turned into the road under fire, and we all 
tl'ought he was shot until late in the day. The word 
was passed down the line, and the men began to 




MAJ JOHN A MAGUIRE. 
MAJ W. J. WHITTHORNE 



MAJ A C. GILLEM 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS, 



15 



swear and dernand an advance, for they wanted re- 
venge. The knightly old gentleman was carried to 
the rear, and the word forward was given. 

"The colonel was in the act of giving Maj. Cheat- 
ham his instructions when he fell. and. outside of a 
general idea of the work to be done he knew noth- 
ing. We were to support the Utah Battery, which 
was hammering away 2,000 yards ahead. We had 
to cross the San Juan river on a high-backed bridge, 
the most exposed place on the tiring line, and the 
only way was in a column of forty-five. The gallant 
little Cheatham never hesitated, but ordered us for- 
ward. The Mausers, thank goodness, all fired high, 
were whirring, and the men were looking at each 
other as they marched along, when, just at the right 
ircment somebody yelled, 'Charge.' It was like new 
whisky. Every man threw up his head, gave a .veil. 
and then began a footrace in perfect order. We 
went over the bridge, dashed int® position behind 
the battery, and in less time than it takes to tell it 
Companies B and M were sending niggers to glory. 
We drove them back slowly, for they were brave lit- 
tle devils, and if they knew how to shoot we wouldn't 
be here to tell about it. We edged along, running 
them out of trench after trench, until we took the 
hill — which, by the way, is called San Juan. 

"The Nebraskans, who had been fighting thirty 
hours, were on our left, and had the bulk of tho 
fighting. They lost several men in this advance. We 
rested awhile at the insurgent headquarters, then 
formed a long line and attacked the San Phillipe con- 
vent, which is practically impregnable; but we had 
little trouble, as the yellow boys had been hit too 
hard on the hill. The campaign the rest of the day 
took on the form of a rabbit drive. They would lie 
in ambush and shoot a few rounds, and would be 
dropped by our marksmen when they tried to get 
away. I hear we drove several hundred across the 
river, and saw more dead ones than I care to think 
of. We spent the night in the convent. 

"The Tenness3e troops did not seem to have even 
a little shyness nor excitement. They laughed, and 
most remarkable of all. preserved perfect fire disci- 
pline. My company, I know, never fired a shot with- 
out orders, and the officers of tne others say the 
same. The only trouble was keeping some of the 
men behind the line, they were so anxious to see 
and do something. John Bass, the celebrated war cor- 
respondent, who is doing the campaign foj- H r 
Weekly, was with us all day. He said nothing for 
quite awhile, but finally told me he never saw such 
coolness and discipline. He told me confidentially 
that he was betting on our going to pieces when we 
crossed the bridge, but he now knew the men would 
go anywhere. He was surprised at the shooting, for 
we killed some on the run at 2.000 yards. 

"Some one asked Maj. Cheatham who had shown 
the best nerve. He replied that there was no be.st. 
that he had watched every one. and if he was asked 
to recommend a man for the bravest he would have 
to send the battalion, as they all looked alike to him." 

Another account was given by Lieut. Robert Mi- 
lam, in a letter to his father, who resides in Nash- 
ville: 

"We went with the determin-dt;on," he wrote. 
"to carry hon<H- to Dixie or die in the attempt. We 
came up on the Fourth Cavalry at th;- end of a lane. 
end right here I want to say that I never saw men 
who feared death less than the boys under their 
first fire. The bullets were flying over our heads 
and cutting down leaves all around us. In going \ip 
this lane the boys were joking with each other about 
it. I didn't see a single man who faltered. Well. 
we halted in the rear of the Fourth Cavalry, and de- 
cided that the best plan would be for us to flank 



them while the Fourth held their fire in front, and 
we set about it accordingly. 

"We cut through the trees to our left and darted 
across, one at a time, an open space that the sharp- 
shooters were working on. and gained blockhouse 13. 
From here we formed the skirmish line and advanced 
across the rice fields towards the woods where the 
Filipinos were. This advance was made in rushes of 
about fifty yards, and then halted, lying down. Here 
was where the Mausers played 'Home. Sweet Home' 
to us. We then swung our line into the right a little, 
and the Fourth opened at the same time, and also a 
part of the Third Artillery. The Filipinos had by 
this time seen our men and retreated, and then broke 
into a run, and finally scattered like a disorganized 
niob, 

"It was all we could do to restrain the men. Wo 
followed them for about three miles, and had to give 
it up as night came on and we were in danger of 
getting cut off from the trenches, and ammunition 
was low. We relieved the Fourth at the trenches 
that night, and nothing occurred, outside of a little 
ragged firing, of any consequence the rest of the 
night. I forgot to tell you that we did not go out 
as a regiment, but the battalions were sent sepa- 
rately to different places. The Second Battalion did 
the heaviest fighting, as the natives made a good 
stand for a while. 

"They were sent to reinforce the Utah Battery and 
Idaho Volunteers, and were ordered to take a bridge 
held by the natives. 

"The charge was made: they gave the rebel yell, 
and poured in such a galling fire that the niggers 
couldn't stand it. and turned tail. They took the 
biidge and fought their way to the waterworks, two 
miles further on. and took them also. Capt. Whit- 
thorne was slightly wounded in the arm. This is all 
the facts 1 could find out. 

"Col. Smith died of apoplexy. The Third Battalion 
did not get into anything as they were used as a 
reserve. The most remarkable thing of all is that 
we were all under fire from one to five hours, and 
under from eight to fifteen hours' scattering fire and 
not a man lost. We killed, wounded, and captured 
more than 2.000 Filipinos. So far as can be known, 
ou;- losses are 145 killed and wounded badly — these 
will die — and over 200 slightly wounded. The Four- 
teenth United States Infantry lost more than any 
other regiment." 

As stated in Lieutenant Milam's letter, the battal- 
ions comprising the Tennessee companies were sent 
to different places. To be more precise, on February 
•5, Col. Smith, with Cheatham's battalion, was sent to 
the Santa Mesa district, where they were on the 
fighting line until the following evening. On the 
same day Col. Childers. with Bayless' battalion, was 
ordered to the Paco district, and he commanded on 
the left of the line at the taking of blockhouse No. 
1^. and in the pursuit of the insurgents afterwards, 
while Maguire's battalion was sent to the Tondo dis- 
trict, and served on that part of the line. The whole 
rcgment was returned to camp after the battle of 
Fcliruary G. and ordei-ed to prepare for going on 
board ship. 

'the members of the First won glory enough in 
ll'(> affairs around Manila, but the death of Col. 
Smith cast a gloom over them. He was a capable 
ofiicor. was loved by his men, and would have greatly 
distinguished himself had he not fallen so early in 
the engagement, a victim of apoplexy. 

it may as well be stated here as further along 




CAPT NICK K GIVENS 
CAPT. GASTON O'BRIEN 



CAPT H B MYERS. 



LIEUT T H BATES. 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



17 



that Lieiit. Col. Gracey Childers succeeded to the 
command left vacant by the death of Col. Smith. 
Promotions followed, so that the roster of commis- 
sioned officers was radically changed, as will be seen 
by a reference to the pages following this sketch. 



it 



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i THE TENNESSEANS AT ILOILO 






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■i.:V 



ON the night of February 10. the First Tennessee 
arrived off Iliolo. in the Isle of Panay. where 
conditions were much like those at Manila, 
and where Gen. Miller had been waiting for 
weeks in the harbor; and on the morning of Febru 
ary 11, although the last regiment ordered ashore. 
It was the first to make a landing. 

The insurgents protested against the landing of 
the Americans, consequently the place was bom- 
barded. A 6-pounder thundered from the Frtnl. and 
the city was immediately set on fire by the natives. 
Then followed other shells from the Petrel and the 
Chartcston. A party of sailors and a portion of the 
First effected a landing, beating the Eighteenth 
Regulars ashore. They landed from small boats, 
jumping into the surf, and wading. Rushing into 
the cit:^, fighting as they went, they succeeded in 
saving a part of It from the flames. "After the fire 
died down," wrote a Tennessee boy, "the scene along 
the beach was awful. Bodies of dogs, cats, horses. 
anO a few men and women were lying here and 
there — some burned, others killed by shells and bul- 
lets. Spanish families standing here and there, weep- 
ing- over the ruins of their homes, but greeting us 
A\'ith smiles, their streaming eyes begging us to take 
vengeance. We took It. We are holding down a 
Uring line four miles long (two regiments and a bat- 
tery of artillery). We may have another fight, but 
I doubt it. though we are occasionally worried by 
sharpshooters. Two regulars were killed over the 
river by sharpshooters over a mile away." 

The following is an extract from Lieut. Col. A. B. 
Bayless' account of the way the First occupied its 
time from the taking of lloilo to about June 1: 

"Siuce the taking of lloilo our regiment, or detach 
ments of the regiment, have taken part in all battles 
or skirmishes that have taken place here, and if you 
are not too weary, I will give you a short account of 
what has happened since February 11. 

"On the morning of February 25, four of our com- 
panies marched to iMandurraio, which is locateu be- 
tween Molo and Jaro, not in a direct line between 
these two cities, but some distance further into the 
interior. While the command was resting, Lieut. 
Milam was sent out in cnarge of a scouting party, 
and in about an hour one of the scouts returned and 
reported that the enemy nad been located about one 
and a half miles out. Two companies were sent 
Tip the road and two made a direct attack on the in- 
.surgents, who were founa to be occupying three 
lines of trenches. Without going into details, the 



insurgents were driven out of their strongholds with 
many casualties in their own ranks, while our troops 
suffered none whatever. While in this case, as in 
every battle our regiment has been in, each and 
every ofticer and man did his part well, however the 
circumstances in this particular battle were more 
fa\oral)le for Capt. Hagar (Company E) and his com- 
pany, and Lieut. Milam and his scouts from Company 
C, to do most of the work. 

"Shortly afterwards we returned to Mandurraio, 
remaining there until after noon, when we re.urneu 
to our barracks via Jaro. 

"On March 16. the battle of Jaro river was fought, 
principally by Maj. Kellers battalion. However, two 
other companies of the Lighteenth. as well as B. C, 
L. and M. of our regiment, participated. Our battal- 
ion was first intended as a reserve to the Eighteenth, 
but, as luck would have it, the insurgents were some- 
what loath to retire. Therefore, Gen. Miller ordered 
our battalion into the firing line. and. as usual, they 
behaved only as you would have them. Only two of 
cur men were scratched, and these did not even go 
on sick report the next morniug. Some had their 
gun stocks shattered. One man in Company C had 
his hair parted 'Sam Jones' style by a Mauser bullet, 
it passing through his hat e.\actly in the center. 

"On April 1 we had tjuite an excursion to Oton, 
which is up the beach about eight or nine miles from 
lloilo. Three companies, under Cheatham, were 
placed aboard tugs and sent to a point one and a 
half miles above Oton, while I. with three companies, 
accompanied by Capt. Bridgman and a platoon of 
artillery, went overland. I have no hesitancy m 
stating that the plans mapped out by Col. Childera 
were most admirably executed. Cheatham and my- 
self connecting at the exact time appointed, and 
swooping down upon the town of ,faro, to the utter 
dis.may of the inhabitants. However, the insurgent 
army had vacateu the day before. The trip, although 
unsuccessful in its main reasons, was successful, as 
we captured telegrams, letters, documents, maps, 
etc.. which afterwards proved beneficial to tiie com- 
manding general of this district. We returned to 
our barracks, tired and dusty, in time for dinner. 

"On April 17, I went to ftianila on board the Petrel, 
which was convoying thirteen gunboats bought from 
Spain, was most royally treated by all the otflcers, 
and enjoyed the trip immensely. It has always been 
my desire to be aboard a man-of-war in time of 
action, and my desire came very near being gratified, 
and. in a manner, it was, for the reason that one of 
these Spanish gunboats — which by the way, were 
nrmed by the insurgents — tried to give us the shake, 
and started off at full speed in the opposite direction. 
No sooner had the quartermaster reported this lact 
to the officer of the deck when call to quarters was 
sounded, and in a very short time the 6-pounder 
brought the runaway alongside our boat. 

"In lloilo. at the present time, we are only holding 
our lines, making no advances whatever, as such are 
our orders. The work is not as hard as the active 
campaigning would be, especially in this country at 
this season of the year, but at the same time it is 
very tiresome and irksc me to do nothing, as we are 
anxious to get out and have a good rabbit hunt." 

As the fighting around lloilo about the middle of 
March, referred to in Lieut. Col. Bayless' letter, was 
severe, the account of the New York Herald will be 
appreciated The dispatch to that jniu'iial stated: 

"A battalion of the Eighteenth Infantry, a i)latoon 
of the Sixth Artillery, and the machine gun battery 
made a reciuuiaisance in the direction of Mandur- 
raio and Santii Harluir.i. Thur.sday. While they were 
returning the insurgents attacked the outposts on 
the right. Although fatigued from marching in the 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



19 



broiling sun for two hours, ttie entire command pro- 
ceeded to tiie assistance of tlieir comrades, the 
artillery pouring shell and shrapnel upon the insur- 
gents, who were strongly intrenched in large num- 
bers. 

"Companies C, H. and K. of the Eighteenth, de- 
ployed to the right, driving the insurgents back, 
and then wheeling to the left, made a junction with 
Companies B and I, A heavy engagement ensued. 
Companies B, C, M, and I, of the Tennessee Volun- 
teers, Maj, Cheatham commanding, arrived later and 
formed un the left, and two more companies of the 
Eighteenth marched from Iloilo to act as support to 
the other troops. Col. Van Valzah and Maj. Keller 
commanded the battalions of the Eighteenth Regi- 
ment. 

"Gen. Miller was on the scene early, and directed 
tho operations from immediately behind the fighting 
lino. He had several narrow escapes. 

"The line advanced by rushes 3,000 yards under a 
hot fire, pouring in deliberate volleys upon the ene- 
my's position, the artillery making good practice, 

"By the time the forces were within 300 yards of 
the enemy's final position, darkness fell, preventing 
the charge, for which the Tennessee men and the 
companies of the Eighteenth on the right had al- 
ready prepared by fixing bayonets. The retirement 
upon Jaro was accomplished in good order. 

"The engagement was brought on by the persistent 
attacks upon the outpost at Jaro bridge. Nothing 
could be gained by forcing the enemy further back, 
as it was impossible, with the limited number of 
troops, to hold the position. 

"The American troops were exhausted by the fight- 
ing and having to wade knee deep through the rica 
fields and sugar cane. There were several cases of 
prostration by the heat. 

"The severity of the engagement may be judged 
from the fact that the Eighteenth Regiment alone 
fired 62,800 rounds. It is estimated that the insur- 
gents, with their more than 2,000 rifles, fired more 
than double our total ammunition, 

"It is impossible to tell accurately the insurgents' 
losses, as the American troops converged at a given 
point without traversing the grouna shot over, out 
on (he day after the battle I could see from Jaro 
belfry the enemy carting away the dead. The mini- 
mum estimate of their losses is 200 killed and 300 
wounded. 

"The evolutions were prettily executed and the 
highest credit is due the battalion and company com- 
manders. The men are chafing at being robbed of 
tho fruits of their victory. A charge would probably 
have resulted in the capture of the enemy's arms 
and ammunition, but from the configuration of the 
ground and the position of our troops, it was impos- 
sible to allow an advance in the darkness. The 
behavior of the troops was admirable." 



M, Twenty-third Regular Infantry, all under the 
command of Capt. W. H. Allaire. A month later Jim 
Duckworth, the American correspondent, gave the 
information that four companies of the regiment — 
A, C, H, and K — were in Cebu, 300 miles south of 
Iloilo, having left the latter city on June 13. Still 
later, September 17, Lieut, Pilcher informed the 
Banner readers that Companies A, B, and C were at 
Pasig. while Company G was at Taguig. They were 
certainly moving sufficiently among new scenes to 
keep their minds off of home, but the rumors which 
began to be heard aroused the feeling of homesick- 
ness once more. What should we expect, then, un- 
der the circumstances, but to find Lieut, Pilcher's 
communication ending with somewhat of sentiment? 
"Yes, the old regiment is going home," he says. "But 
you give them a good time, and ring the bells loud 
enough for those to hear who are lefc behind. The 
regiment has contributed its share of those who are 
'absent, but accounted for.' Every stopping place 
has its little squad of Tennesseans who have heard 
the soldiers' last tattoo. Presidio cemetery, Pecos 
cemetery, and the Protestant cemetery, at Iloilo, all 
hold members of the light-hearted crowd of boys 
who left the State with yells and cheers over a year 
ago. Don't forget them. The number will be in- 
creased before this little disturbance is over, for 
200 of the boys have stayed behind because they are 
needed, and all of them are not going back." 



m= 



... SCOTLTTITVlCx ... 

Cebu, Pardo, and Other Points 



& 



Ei= 



CHE soldiers of the First saw considerable serv- 
ice in detached companies after the taking of 
Iloilo, but the excitement — with the exception 
of that experienced in the battle described by 
the New York Herald correspondent — was not great. 
Under date of June 2S, the correspondent of the 
Nashville Banner wrote that Company H was at 
Pardo, Cebu. The detachment was with Company 



I THE HOME-COMIXG 7 

I AXl) SO]ME EULOGIES | 



flFTER about sixteen months' absence, the 
First Tennessee was to return. The brief 
chronicles herein give only a hint of what 
they accomplished in those months, and 
what they underwent. Could the imagination do 
justice to those soldiers who left home with its com- 
forts and loved ones to offer their lives on the altar 
of their country — were we enabled to feel all they 
have felt and comprehend the contests they have 
had with Death, and stared him down — we would be 
willing to make their home-coming the occasion for 
an even grander demonstration. 

The definite announcement of the return of the 
First Regiment was made in a dispatch from Manila, 
under date of October 7. The advices read as fol- 
lows: 

"The Tennessee Regiment, the last of the volun- 
teers, will sail for the United States to-morrow, on 
board the transport Indiimn. after a week passed in 
the harbor. Most of the year these troops have been 
stationed in the southern islands. Their colonel 
says they are in excellent health, and nave been 
much benefited by service. Six hundred and sev- 
enty-three will sail. Three officers and ninety-one 
men remain to enter into business here. Sixteen 




I CAPT SHEFFIELD CLARK 
3. CAPT. NICK GIVENS 4 CAPT VAN LEER 

6 CAPT GASTON O'BRIEN 



2 CAPT S O MURPHY 

5 CAPT W J GILBREATH. 
7. CAPT. H. R RICHMOND 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT. UNITED STATE? VOLUNTEERS. 



21 



officers and 165 men hare been discharged for re- 
enlistment. Two men were killed in action, and one 
killed accidentally. Chaplain Leland and seven men 
died of disease. 

But here is another incident of patriotism which 
add.« additional glory to their career: The Indiana 
was sent south early in September to collect the legi- 
ment. detachments of which were in lloilo and Cebu. 
A portion were picked up at the former city. Pro- 
ceeding to Cebu. it was learned that the insurgents 
had gathered in force among the mountains near that 
city: whereupon the regiment volunteered and were 
accepted to assist in driving the enemy from their 
stronghold. Here was the supreme act of valor. Be 
yond seas were their homes, dotting vale and dell. 
and along city thoroughfares: they could see eyes 
anxiously scanning the papers hoping to learn that 
they were coming back: they knew that parents" 
prayers were continually ascending to heaven for 
their safety. On the other hand, they saw an enemy 
of the country threatening the flag — and then they 
faced death once more for "'Old Glory." "The Presi- 
dent said that whenever he thought of those brave 
boys, he felt a lump in his throat and could hardly 
speak."" reported a local paper detailing the visit of 
the Tennessee aelegation to solicit his presence at 
Nashville on the regiment"s return. How could he 
liave been affected otherwise? And it was eminently 
proper that the Manila American should refer to 
them in these eulogistic words: 

""When the First Tennessee Infantry sailed from 
lloilo for Cebu the soldiers of this famous regiment 
thought that their fighting in the Philippines had 
been done. But when they arrived in Cebu and 
learned that an engagement was about to take place, 
the Tennesseans eagerly volunteered to go against 
the enemy. Several of the companies had turned in 
their shelter tents and other equipage, but all they 
wanted was their rifles and plenty of ammunition. 
Krag-Jorgensen rifles were issued to the men of the 
First Tennessee Infantry, but no soldier knew better 
how to use their old Springfields. 

"The country was very rough: in fact, it was all 
ravines and ridges, except for one narrow and very 
beautiful little valley. On the mountain spurs which 
run down towards the sea. the insurrectos had 
erected a chain of forts, stretching around a semi- 
circle and commanding every avenue of approach. 

•'On an elevated knob, about 2 500 yards from the 
rebel works, a 3 2-10 gun belonging to Light Battery 
G of the Sixth Artillery had been planted. The hill- 
side was so steep the cannon was gotten into posi- 
tion only with the greatest difficulty. At first, cari- 
baos were made use of to drag up the gun. but when 
they came to the steep places the clumsy beasts were 
useless, and the gun was pulled up the sharp ascent 
by a company of soldiers. All this had been done be- 
fore the Tennessee regiment arrived, and when the 
necessary disposition had been made all was in read- 
iness for in attack. 

"The attacking forces moved on the insurgent front 
in three columns. 

"The first column went to the left, and was led by 
Maj. Maguire. It consisted of the First Battalion of 
the First Tennessee Infantry and detachments from 
the Sixth Infantry. 

"In the second column, which occupied the centre, 
was the Second Battalion of the Tennessee Regiment 
and Company K of the Nineteenth Infantry. This 



column was under the command of Maj. Whicthorne. 
an ofiicer who formerly served with great distinction 
in the Confederate Army. 

The third column was made up of the Third Bat- 
talion of the First Tennessee Infantry and more 
troops from the Twenty-third Infantry. This column 
icclined toward the right to create a diversion, and 
was under the command of Maj. Gillem. Col. Chil- 
ders. the commanding officer of the First Tennessee 
Regiment, was with the second column, and Brig.- 
Gen. Snyder posted himself with artillery, where he 
could overlook the whole field and direct the fighting 
to the best advantage. 

"In moving forward the Americans went up the 
ridges, which ran somewhat parallel to one another 
from the seashore back to the mountains. After 
some well-directed shells from the lone cannon on the 
hilltop had been planted in the insurrecto trenches, 
the three columns advanced under a fierce fire from 
ihe insurgent earthworks on ' the mountain sides 
above. This was on the afternoon oi September 22. 
The troops under Maj. Maguire encountered the 
fiercest resistance, and. inasmuch as the lay of the 
country deprived this portion of the attacking force 
or" the assistance of the other two columns, the 
men under the gallant Maj. Maguire had a very hard 
time of it. But they kept cool and stuck to their 
work until nightfall. Although they were fighting 
side by side, the Tennesseans seemed to be more 
lucky than their companions of the Sixth infantry. 
None of the Tennessee boys were hit. but out of the 
Sixth Infantry there were one killed and six 
■ivounded. The side hills were so very steep that the 
wounded men were carried back with the utmost 
difficulty. The soldiers who were bearing away their 
dead comrade slipped and fell, and the body rolled 
down hill 200 yards before it stopped. 

"The Americans, who slept on their arms that night 
'rnchored" themselves before they went to sleep. 
Most of the men drove their bayonets into the 
ground and then tied themselves to the shank, to 
keep from sliding down hill. 

""Early the next morning the advance was resumed, 
and at this time the Americans were under fire from 
three different points. Sheltering themselves as best 
they could, they crawled forward up the rugged de- 
clivities and poured a deadly stream of lead into the 
insurrecto lines. Just as the worst of the struggle 
seemed about to begin, when no one doubted but 
what a desperate assault would have to oe made in 
order to take the insurrecto works, the Insurgents 
vamoosed. 

"".\mong the trophies which the First Tennessee 
cpptured at the battle of Cebu was an insurgent bat- 
tle flag, and the regiment also took the insurrecto 
arsenal. This was located back of the forts, and 
here the rebels had been manufacturing brass and 
zinc shells for their smooth-bore cannon. These 
shells were peculiar-looking things, being plugged 
with wood and filled with old scrap iron. 

"The insurgents suft'ered severely from the shells 
thrown by the cannon on the knob, and bullets from 
Springfield and Krag-Jorgensen rifles laid many an 
insurrecto low. 

"'Numerous newly-made graves were found in the 
rear of the fort, and in a bloody sack which the in- 
surgents did not have time to take away with them 
were found the remains of a Filipino who came in 
ctiitact with a 2-10 inch shell. 

"The capture of the insurrecto fortifications at Cebu 
was one of the most brilliant things that have been 
dene in the Philippine Islands, and all the troops who 
participated in the event are entitled to the greite = t 
credit. Of the detachment of the Sixth Artillery and 
of the men of the Sixth. Nineteenth, and Twenty- 
third Infantry, the Tennesseans speak in terms of 
the highest praise, and the best of good feeling pre- 




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THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS, 



23 



vailed between the regulars and the volunteers while 
they were down there. 

"When the insurrectos had been put to flight, and 
two companies of the Nineteenth Infantry held the 
mountain passes to prevent the return c£ the rebels. 
the First Tennessee Regiment reembarkea on the 
JiididiiK and came from Cebu to Manila, arriving 
iu the harbor on Sunday afternoon. The liiiliiimi 
will probably remain in port here for four days be- 
fore proceeding to the United States, and it is possi- 
ble that the paymaster will pay the gallant Ten- 
nesseans a visit in the meantime. The pay-rolls are 
all made out, and the boys have room in their pock- 
ets for $15,60, or any other amount that may be 
coming to them, 

"As the last of the volunteers to be mustered out, 
and as the only representatives of the South in the 
Philippines, as well as for their meritorious services 
and excellent fighting qualities, the Fa'st Tennessee 
Regiment is assured of an overwhelming welcome 
on its return to America. When the transport lit- 
(iidiiii gets homo, the whole American nation will 
hurrah for the First Tennessee Infantry." 



ARRIVAL AT SAN FRANCISCO 



®H 



CHE fact that Tennessee is proud of the record 
made by her soldiers is evidenced by the 
enthusiastic way her citizens have gone about 
preparing a demonstrative welcome. Not 
only will they give the cordial handclasp, but a 



business position of some sort is to be secured for 
each member of the regiment. 

Committees have been organized for weeks, and 
all have gone about their duties and specialties as if 
in their lexicon, too, there was no such word as fail. 

A Nashville delegation to meet the soldeirs at San 
Francisco left on November 1. The delegation was 
made up of the following persons: B. J. McCarthy, 
Miss Mary H Cockrill. Mrs, H, F, Beaumont. Mrs. 
Duncan Dorris. .1. S. Chandler. G. T. Halley. Mrs. 
K. B, Buckner. Miss Kirby, Mrs J. K. Polk, Mrs, Nat 
Gcoch, Mr. and Mrs, William Brandon, of Dover, Hon. 
J, W, Gaines, J. W. Frierson, Mrs. A. C. Gillem, Mrs. 
James Andrews. Miss Bullock, C. H. Johnson. Mrs. 
Elmer Bruce. Mrs. T. W. McMillin, Mrs. R. E, Martin, 
W. A. McGraw, Miss Queen. Mrs. Clay Stacker. Mrs. 
C. W. Beaumont. Miss Katherine O'Brien, Miss Lou- 
ise Heggie, Finis Ewing, Jr., J. A. Cheatham, and 
Cave Johnson, of Clarksville, Mrs. J, G, Maguire, 
of McMinnville, 

The Iniliinid. bearing the First Tennessee, reached 
San Francisco, November 11. at 10 o'clock, having on 
board 620 enlisted men and forty-four officers. Since 
the regiment left the United States 165 men and 16 
officers were discharged, and 91 men and three other 
ofllcers took their discharge when the First was 
ordered home. 

The programme for the entertainment of the re- 
turning soldiers at the Tabernacle, is given on 
another page. 




in; THE SUBURBS OF MANILA, SELLING BUFFALO MILK. 




PROGRAMME 



FOR THE ENTKKTAINMENT OF THE KETUKNING SOLDIERS, AT 
THE TABEKNACLE. 

1. Music, "Columbia." 

2. Prayer, . . . Bishop T. F. GaiL.r. 

3. Music, " Suwanee River." 

4. Address on behalf of State, Governor McMillin. 

5. Address on behalf of city, . Hon. J. i\I. Head. 

6. Address on behalf of all soldiers in this and 

former wars, . . Hon. Tully Brown. 

7. Music, "America." 

8. , Address, . . . President McKinley. 

9. Music. "Stars and Stripes Forever, " . Sousu. 

10. Response on behalf of the First Tennessee 

Re,i:;iment, . . . Col()nc-l Childers. 

11. Addresses by distin'^-uished'g'uests, inters])ersed 

with music of patriotic airs. 

12. Music, " Star Spanyied Banner." 

13. Benediction, . . . Dr. J. 1. Vance. 

14. Music. 



( 3.-. I 



KBGl\Ji:\IAI. ROSTER 



Members op the First Tennessee Discharged at San Francisco, 

November 23, 1899 



II" 






..., .,«^»...........>„..,.....„............ 


"Wi 




COLONEL, . GRACEY CHILDERS 


^1 

IP! 


is 


LlETTKNANT COLONEI., 


Albert Bavless 


' Chaplain, . Frank M. Wells 


ij 


Major, 


John A. Maguire 


1st Lieut, and Adjt., B. Nelson Coffman 


:| 


Major, . 


Wm. J. Whitthorne 


2d Lieut, and Quar. . James W. Moore 


ti 


ill 


Major, 


Alvin C. Gillem 


Sergeant Major, . . M. G. Campbell 


1 


11 


Major and Strgeox, 


. KiciiARr) A Barr 


Quartermaster Sergeant, W. N. Macjuire 




Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



CHAPLAIN LELAND. 



COMPANY A. 



George Reed, Captain. 

W. A. Alexander, First Lieutenant. 

J. E. Kiintz, Second Ijieutenant. 

Charles McLester, former Second Lieutenant, was 
made First Lieutenant in Cheatham's battalion. 
Thirty-seventh Infantry. .J. W. Burks, .Jr.. formerly 
Duty Serjeant of this company, was made Second 
\Lieutenant of Company H. William Caruthers. 
former Corporal, was made First Lieutenant of Com- 
pany L. 

(■.-7) 



Anderson, C. 
Burks, J. W., Jr. 
Bashaw. Lex. 
Bean. W. O. 
Bowers. R. H. 
Bowers. L. 
Bruce, Sam. 
Campbell. V. G. 
Campbell. W. D. 
Cockrill. D. S. 
Coldiron. D. F. 
Cook. J. C. 
Cunningham. E. ( 
Dean, J. F. 
Duff. Charles. 
Du Ross, N. G. 
Farr. J. C. 
Feller, Alfred. 
Garner, H. 
Goodloe. H. 
Green. Eddie. 
Green. Thos. 
Hassell, M. H. 
Herron. W. W. 
Higgins. E. 
Jones, Homer. 
Key. G. D. 
Keeton. L. 
King, E M. 
Lazenby. J. W. 



Lamberson. A. B. 
Ligon. W. 
Litchens. J. 
Majors. R. K. 
McDonald. R. 
Norton. W. 
Osborn. C. P. 
Parker. J. R. 
Penny. L. K. 
Pettrie, T. B. 
Petty. T. J. 
Pierce. M. J. 
Polk. Jas. K.. Jr. 
Polk. L. 
Ramey. F. 
Rawley. M. J. 
Shofner, Earl P 
Shriver. J. 
Skelly, J. P. 
Steele. D. 
Tanksley. J. W. 
Taylor, W. 
Toon, H. J. 
Turner, J. 
Whittle, S. 
Wilson. Thos. 
Wenger. F. 
Woods, J. W. 
Whitney. F 
Zulligu. J. E. 




I 



I SCENES IN CAMP AT SAN FRANCISCO 2 THE CALIFORNIA SAND HILLS. GOLDEN GATE BEYOND. 

3 IN FRONT OF TENT OF LIEUT PATRICK STACKER 



REGIMENTAL ROSTER, THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. V, 



29 




Waters. Wm. Wilson. J. G. 

Whittaker. Percy B. 

COMPANY C. 

Alfred J. Law, Captain. 

Robert E. Martin. First Ijieutenant. 

.lames T. Quarles, Second Lieu'.enant. 

Henry R. Richmond, former Captain, was trans- 
ferred to the Thirty-seventh Infantry. C. C. Winnia. 
former First Sergeant, was made First Lieutenant in 
Ihe Eleventh Cavalry. 



GETTING THEIR COIN. 



COMPANY B. 



Robert Milam, Captain. 

Austin Cabler, First Lieutenant. 

W. J. Whitthorne, former Captain, is now Major 
of the regiment. Edward S. Fowler, former First 
Lieutenant, is now practicing law in San Francisco. 
Robert O. Ragsdale. former Second Lieutenant, was 
promoted to First Lieutenant, and ihen transferred 
to the Thirty-seventh Infantry, Alvin Baskette, 
former First Sergeant of Company F, was made Sec- 
ond Lieutenant in Company B in Ragsaale's place. 
He was afterward transferred to the Thirty-seventh 
Infantry. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Aiken. J. E. 
Baker, Joe. 
Barker, A. A. 
Baugh, M. G. 
Blackman, E. C. 
Boone. Jesse J. 
Bowen. A. 
Bullock, C. E. 
Bunch, Chas. 
Cooper, J. O. 
Criswell, J. W. 
Darragh. T. D. 
Ferris, B. E. 
Fowler. O. L. 
Gaylord, u. C. 
Glenn. O. E. 
Gum. John H. 
Higley. Guy. 
Hood, J. L. 
Holt. J. O. 
Jarrett. Thos. 
Lane. R. M. 



Long. J, F. 
Lowthrop, W. M. 
Lunn. J. R. 
McConnell, Ben. 
Martin, W. T. 
Morgan. W. H. 
Murfree. J. B, 
Murphy. L. W. 
Parham. W. P, 
Pond. L K. 
Powell. W, E. 
Roh'eder. C H. 
Roberts. F. B. 
Russ. G. H. 
Searcy. O, W. 
Seaton, Walter. 
Smith, T, M. 
Thomijson. O. L. 
\ aughan. R. 1 . 
Vaughan, W. T. 
Wade. D. F. 
Waggoner. Morton. 



Noncommissioned 

Allen. H. A. 
Arendell. A. J. 
Arundell. A. J. 
Baine, Thomas F. 
Baker. V. 
Diddle. Earl. 
Blankinship, A. B. 
Brazelton. Clyde. 
Brown. Jas, 
Chisho'.m, S. S. 
Chlsholm. A. J. 
Crump. C. L. 
Daudiborn, Alexis. 
Doherty. G. W. 
Uutchner. C. 
Edwards, T. 
Eldridge, J. R. 
Ellis, P. 
Frizzell. u. C. 
Galligher, F. 
Gallimore. J. I. 
Gallimore, Wm. E. 
Gass. John. 
Gore, Luke T. 
Graves, E. G. 
Hallersley. M. J. 
Hayes, R. L. 
Hilton, John F. 
Home, E, R. 
Huber, Elwood. 
Johnson, B. D. 
Joiner. W. P. 
Jones. Jas. L. 
Keeling, James. 
Kinkead. W. W. 
Lacey, Oscar. 
Lester. Evan. 
Linnville. J. W. 
Luck. Jas. M. 



Officers and Privates. 

Lomasney, D. F. 
Long, John. 
Lowe. Jas. T. 
Martin. W. 
Meadows. Thos. J. 
Miller. J. W. 
Mitchell. G. J. 
Morrison. F. 
Moody. H. 
Moore. Don D. 
Morgan. J. M. 
Myers, W, E. 
O'Leary. D. 
Prize. W. L. 
Quarles, Jas, T, 
Rash. G. B. 
Ream. B. 
Reed, F. 
Rosser. M. 
Rowley. J. H. 
Rundle. J. W. 
Settle, B, 
Sheppard. H. N. 
Simpson. D. P. 
Speakman. M. 
Stafford, Zeb. 
Sweeney, Henry B. 
Taylor. W. P. 
Taylor. R. L. 
Thomas, F. 
Tinsley, Leslie. 
Turner. R. E. 
Van Hooser. G. H. 
Wheeler. LeRoy. 
Whitstone, M. B. 
Whittaker. J. A. 
Whittaker. G. F. 
William.s. H. A. 
Young, Scipio. 




?^. 






REGIMENTAL ROSTER. THE FIRST TENNESSEE RE(iIMENT. V. S. V. 



31 




SUSPENSION BRIDGE AT MANILA 

CROSSED OFTEN BY TENNESSEANS GOING TO BILIBID PRISON 



COMPANY D. 

William J. Oalbreath. Captain. 

Edward C. McNeal, First Lieutenant. 

Edson E. McNealy, Second Lieutenant. 

Joe B. Cocke, former Second Lieutenant, was 
transferred to the Thirty-seventh Infantry. Mark G. 
Fakes, former Duty Sergeant, was made Quarter- 
master Sergeant and Second Lieutenant. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Alexander, C. 
Alexander, Edward. 
Aired. James W. 
Anderson. Lem O. 
Bidwell. G. L. 
Blair, Chas. W. 
Blair, Paine D. 
Boyd, Geo. W. 
Braden, H. H. 
Brown, Neal. 
Bryant, Clay V. 
Bryant, Wm. C. 
Burapass. Thos. L. 
Bumpass. Willie A. 
Bush. J. I. 
Carter. Wm. H. 
Clark. John D. 
Clark. Walter C. 
Cornet. George. 
Cureton. Marion L. 



Davis. G. W. 
Downing, J. T. 
Drake, G, W. 
Duffin. Chas. A. 
Elliott. W. B. 
Gallaher. John A. 
Garland. W. H. 
Guthrie. Frank. 
Guthrie. Will. 
Hall. Joe. 
Harvill, M. M. 
Harwell. H. W. 
Hickey. Edward. 
Holt, Fred A. 
Hooks, Albert L. 
Horn, Lee. 
Humbert. Jas. H. 
Jackson. Benj. 
Keene. James T. 
Kimber, Robt. E. 



Langford. Hick. 
Ledbetter, N. F, 
Marshall, F, E, 
Marsh, Geo, D, 
McClanahan, A, C. 
Milum, Edward S. 
Neeley. Wm. 
Petty. Alvy B. 
Plaskett. C. G. 
Porter. Allen L. 
Sherrell, Wm. B. 
Smith, Thos. B. 
Staley. James D. 
Starr. Chas. L. 



Sutton, Dennis. 
Troxel, George. 
Troxel. Rutus. 
Washburn. C. A. 
Weaver, Will, 
Westdahl, Ford, 
White, Looney A, 
Wiles, Calvin, 
Wilson, Chas. W, 
Winford, Hugh, 
Wright, Atticus H, 
Wright, Mark J. 
Ziegenbein, John, 




'COME SEVEN, COME LEVENI" 



^fm"?^ 




REGIMENTAL EOSTKR, THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. V 



33 







mmmmm 




BAYONET EXERCISE, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL 



COMPANY E. 

James Hager, Captain. 
S. M. Williams. First Lieutenant. 
Nick Malone. Second Lieutenant. 
G. L. Chapman, former First Lieutenant, was trans- 
ferred to the Thirty-seventh Infantry 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Austin, P. 
Bader, H. H. 
Barfield, C. A. 
Barry, J. L. 
Battle, Frank. 
Bigley, D. W. 
Billis, O. J. 
Bonner, W. G. 
Bowden, Rufe. 
Burton, R. H. 
Buchanan, J. M. 
•Caskey, J. L. 
Cassetty, M. 
■Cheat, H. R. 
Clemens. -H. B. 
•Curry, J. H.. Jr. 
Curry. R. O. 
Dillard, W. G. 
Douthett. B. C. 
Davis, G. W. 
Davis, Albert. 
Durdan, John. 
Gant, Wm. P., Jr. 
Godwin. J. 
Greer, Frank. 
Griffin, E. V. 
Griffin, W. E. 
Grigsby, L. K. 
Gussman. C. H. 
Hardiman. Frank 
Haskins. Ben. 
Hester, Bert. 
Ilirshberg, N. 
Hopkins, Tho.s. 
Hughes. Earl. 
.3 



Irving. J. T. 
Johnson. T. J. 
Jones. G. 
Jordan. G. 
King, W. W. 
Kirkpatrick. J. D. 
Lampley. C. F. 
Lawrence. L. P. 
Lee. W. T. 
Love. J. R. 
Malone. Geo. S. 
McCroskey, E. J. 
McFarland, C. A. 
McGinnis, J. 
Moore, R. L. 
Moore. J. B. 
Morrison. W. L. 
Morton, Bob. 
O'Connor, R. L. 
Pool. F. B. 
Rains, I. A. 
Robinson, D. A. 
Rose, G. P. 
Ross, E. A. 
Scott, C. E. 
Searle. B. E. 
Shelton. L J. 
Shelton. J. R. 
Wade, Joe L. 
Weimer, A. H. 
West. J. B. 
Williams, E. W. 
Williamson. E. B. 
Woolard, C. F. 



COMPANY F. 

James Knox Polk. Captain. 

H. H. Eastman, First Lieutenant. 

Thomas E. Hall)ert, Second Lieutenant. 

A. C. Gillem, former Captain, made Major of the 
regiment. R. M. Milam, former First Lieutenant, 
made Captain Company B. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



AUmond. S. E. 
Anderson. R. N. 
Arnett. C. F. 
Ballentine. O. V. 
Barry. R. P. 
Black. N. P. 
Branch. W. F. 
Brown, Leon. 
Brown, J. E. 
Carter, J. W. 
Denton, Wm. 
Duff. J. H. 
Fertig. T. F. 
Fessler, Z. 
Freeman. C. E. 
Gaines. J. M. 
Green. Dock. 
Griffin, N. K. 
Grimes. E. L. 
Guthrie. I. K. 
Hamel. T. N. 
Handley. E. M. 
Hille. O. G. 
Hillman. L. W. 
Hills, F. H. 
Hollowell. J. M. 
Humphreys. Ross. 
Hutson. W. D. 
Isbell. C. F. 
.(rnkins, .1. E. 



Knopp. C. W. 
Malone. J. W. 
Mangrum. W. N. 
Mayes. G. W. 
McCarthy. B. E. 
McDaniel. E. 
Milam, J. H. 
Nunnally. E. M. 
Partin. M. A. 
Phillips, S. N. 
Prater, G. H. 
Regen, J. H. 
Richardson. D. L. 
Schlotter. C. H. 
Short, P. H. 
Slider, C. E. 
Smalhvood, W. S. 
Snow, J. H. 
Stone. D. S. 
Summitt, J. (} 
Sweeney, E. .^. 
Tanner. A. W. 
Taylor, E. C. 
Thompson, J. A. 
Turner, W. G. 
Vick. J. S. 
Walsh. E. J. 
Waters, W. T. 
Winslow. U. P. 
Warren R. B. 



■■\ 




I. LIEUT. C. M MCLESTER. 
2 LIEUT. T E HALBERT. 



3. LIEUT CAVE JOHNSON 

4. LIEUT. C A. RICHARDSON 



5 LIEUT JAMES W MOORE. 

6 LIEUT. H.H. EASTMAN. 



REGIMENTAL ROSTER. THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. V. 



35 




COMPANY H. 

Gaston O'Brien. Captain. 

Bowman Ewing. First Lieutenant. 

J. Willis Burl-e. Second Lieutenant. 

Cave Johnson, former First Lieutenant, and Pat- 
rick L. Stacker, former Second Lieutenant, dis- 
charged. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



AN INNOCENT PASTIME. 



COMPANY G. 



Hugh Sparkman. Captain. 

Thomas F. Bates. First Lieutenant. 

Frank Blakemore. Second Lieutenant. 

H. B. Myers, former Captain, was transferred to 
the Thirty-seventh Infantry. J. \V. Moore, former 
Duty Sergeant, was made Second Lieutenant of Com- 
pany I. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Aughinbaugh, J. 
Bigley, C. S. 
Blacknall. A. 
Blanton. L. W. 
Brannan. W. C. 
Brown, Joe. 
Creasey. Felix. 
Creasey. J. P. 
Creasey, Munroe. 
Daniels, M. P. 
Davis, B. F. 
Davis, John. 
Deal, D. W. 
Durham. J. W. 
Dyer, J. E. 
Ferrell. J. A. 

Gartner, Henry. 

Green, A. J. 

Gross. Geo. 

Hancock, J. B. 

Harrison. Docli. 

Harrison. H. E. 

Hudson. T. R. 

Hurtner. Emial. 

Jackson. J. H. 

Jessup. Leonard. 

Jones, J. A. 

Knight, U. S. 

Mahathey, \Vm. 

Martin. J. W. 

McClain, .4. R. 



McClendon. M. B. 
McDermott. j. 
Mercer. Will. 
Mitchell. Will. 
Moore, Chas. 
Myers, Claude. 
Neal, Jas. 
Odum, J. P. 
Peters. A. V. 
Phillips, M. G. 
Powell. J. H. 
Puterbaugh, C. F. 
Quillen, D. F. 
Ray, J. H. 
Rector, H. W. 
Redden. J. T. 
Redman. S. O. 
Reynolds. R. F. 
Robinson, H. 
Rozzell, Ed. 
Slatton, W. A. 
Sloan. J. W. 
Speck. D. A. 
Sublett. O. R. 
Troop, Will. 
Wells. A. P. 
Wharton, J. J. 
Whittaker. M. H. 
Williams. J. G. 
Willingham, J. W. 



Atkinson. John G. 
Bradley, Wm. 
Eramer, James. 
Drown. C. L. 
Buckingham, T. E. 
Burton, Patrick. 
Clenin, Ernest. 
Clifton. Samuel. 
Coffman, B. N. 
Cooke. H. T. 
Daniel. H. L. 
Driscoll. Richard. 
Eldridge. Wm. 
Ewing, Bowman. 
Forbes, Wm. A. 
Foster, E. J. 
Gray, E. E. 
Harrison. A. B. 
Heggie, Leon A. 
Hoskins. Wm. 
Hunter, John. 
Hyman. Edward. 
Jacks. A. F. 
Jackson. Percy. 
Johnson. Boyd. 
Ligon, G. W. 
Lowry, F. M. 
Mason. C. J. 
McAllister. Kay. 
Mellon, N. 



Miles. Robert. 
Moody. J. S. 
Moran. Wm. T. 
Morefleld. Wm. 
Morrow. W. H. 
Morrow, Nick. 
Owens. L. D. 
Perkins, B. R. 
Prater, Edward. 
Pulley. John. 
Ralls, C. C. 
Randle, Underwood. 
Roberts. J. P. 
Rosenfield. C. 
Sargent. W. O. 
Sands. John M. 
Sheppard. J. A. 
.Shoopman. J. W. 
Smith. V. H. 
Sullivan, D. H. 
Taylor, D. L. 
Tidwell, C. C. 
Triplett, R. K. 
Tuck. P. W. 
Weaks. E. E. 
White, C. B. 
AVilliams. W. H. 
Woodhead. L. F. 
Wright, Chas. 




^ii^' 



OVER THE WASHTUB. 




I. LIEUT PATRICK STACKER. 
2 LIEUT N N 'PICKARD 



3 LIEUT NICK MALONE. 

4 LIEUT. BOWMAN EWING. 



5 LIEUT MORGAN WILLIAMS. 
6. LIEUT. WINSTON PILCHER 



REGIMENTAL ROSTER. THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. Y 



37 




SERGT. CLEMENT C. JONES, 

WHO CAPTURED A FILIPINO FLAG. 



COMPANY I, 



Leon Caraway, Captain. 
Ernest Bowles. First Lieutenant. 
J. W. Moore. Second Lieutenant. 
Nick K. Givens. former Captain, was transferred 
to the Thirty-seventli Infantry, 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates, 



Alexander, J. W. 
Beaton. Will L. 
Bottsford, Louis 1. 
Boyett. Wni. R 
Bi-anum,, E. 
Brewer. \V. T. 
Butcher. Thos. W. 
Carman. R. S. 
Chambers. J. L. 
Chittwood. Richard. 
Chittwood. Ed, 
Clarey, Wm, 
Crosswhite, M. 
Curd. Richard. 
Davis. J. M 
Douglas, I. G. 
Dowdy. Jesse A. 



Eddings, June. 
Fair, Henry. 
Gallion. D. H. 
Glass. Dan. 
Glover, R. E, 
Hall, Robert, 
Hatfield. A. J. 
Hess. John. 
Howard, Jesse, 
Hughes, T. C. 
Jeffries, John. 
Jeffries, LeRoy, 
Jeffries, Pleas. 
Jeffries, Silas. 
Johnson, Joe. 
Looper. C. W, 
Maden, Silias. 



Maupin. W. C. 
McCartt. J. B. 
McGee. G. W. 
McDonald. B. 
Nelson, Ed. 
Oliver. John P. 
Peters. R. K. 
Pettitt. Ross. 
Phillips, B. O. 
Phillips. Thomas. 
Phillips. Thos. L. 
Reed. A. J. 



Reed. Balem. 
Reisden. Isaac. 
Robbins. W. R. 
Sanders. M. 
Sellars. Bruce. 
Sexton, J, M, 
Sexton, Marion, 
Sloan, Ben F. 
Stansbury, Will, 
Waters, James, 
West, J, M, 
Zillner, C, F. 



COMPANY K, 

Samuel O. Murphey, Captain. 
Nixon N. Pickard. First Lieutenant, 
Charles A. Richardson. Second Lieutenant. 
John C. Patton. former First Lieutenant, was trans- 
ferred to the Thirt.v-seventh Infantry. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates, 



Beasley, A. N. 
Bolinger. Ed N. 
Briley, Chas. 
Brown. Robt. 
Burke. Gordon L. 
Byrd. Thos. R. 
Cotton. L. M. 
Crosby. H. A. 
Crawford. Robt. 
Cudworth. Edward. 
Darrow. Frank B. 
Ferguson. E. A. 
Fizer. Joe. 
Fly, Wm, 
Frazier, Guy. 
Freeman, Allen M. 
Geer, T:m. 
Gray, R. H. 
Harris, W, H. 
Hendricks. T. W. 
Honeycutt. R. B. 
Hu.ggins. L. 11. 
Johnson. T. B. 
Jones, J, G. 
Kelly, Hopkins, 
Luton, John. 
Luton. Rolit. 
McCabe. John. 
Merrifield, C. P, 
Morrison, C. W. 
Morris. Ed, 



Murray. I. W. 
Myatt. John. 
Officer. John. 
Patterson, J. B, 
Peters, J. B. 
Peters. R. H. 
Phillips. John W. 
Pinkerton. R. Lee. 
Plunimer. F. S. 
Plumnier, Thos. M. 
Richardson, Robert 1. 
Ross, Matthew, 
Rosson, John B. 
Sheldon, D. B. 
Smith. F. A. 
Smith. \V. E. 
Smith. Sam G. 
Talley. J. N. 
Thomas. J. L. 
Tingley, J, E, 
Walker. Frank. 
Ward. Rufus. 
Warren. Alexander. 
Warren. M. B. 
Webb, Waco, 
White, G, J, 
Whitney, C. V. 
Wilhoite. Tom. 
Winders. M. H. 
Wright. F. G. 




I. CAPT TOM ELLIS. 
2. ARTHUR S EWING 



3. LIEUT A. W. CABLER. 
4 CAPT. LOGAN WILLIAMS 



5 GUAR. M. G CAMPBELL. 
6. LONNIE POLK. 



RECIMENTAI. ROSTER, THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, V. S. V. 



39 



COMPANY L. 

Carles C. Van Leer, Captain. 

AVilliam Caruthers, First Lieutenant. 

W, F. Cooper, Second Lieutenant. 

Sam Van Leer, former Captain, was transferred to 
the Tiiirty-seventli Infantry. Winston Pilcher. 
former Second Lieutenant, was made First Lieuten- 
ant Company H, afterwards transferred to ttie Tliir- 
ty-seventla Infantry. Nat Goocli, former private, was 
made Seetnid Lieutenant Company 11. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Anderson, Chas B. 
Baker, J. E. 
Bayless, W. F. 
Berry. Chas. 
Bowman. F. M. 
Bratten. W. G. 
Burl^e, M. 
Childress. S. C. 



Cook. M. 
Coop. \V. W. 
Crockett. D. T. 
Cockett, H. Y. 
Crocker. E. 
Du-lton. W. 
Davis. Wm. 
Doak, S. T. C. 



Fowler, G. 
Fidlon. Ira. 
Fi'.jua. R. W. 
Galloway. H. 
Oiimsley. W. h. 
Hannah, S. M. 
Hard, Wm. 
Hare, C. A. 
Hillman. C. E. 
House. B. J. 
Hynes. D. F. 
Jenkins, E. 
Jones, H. C. 
Kinney. W. F. 
Knox. Frank T. 
Large. D. F. 
Lawson. John. 
Leathers, G. W. 
Lennerly. W. T. 
Leslie. A. T. 
Lovell, E. J. 



Maynor, W. E. 
Melton, W. C. 
Nichol. Geo. E, 
Oliver, E. R, 
Paulsen, Hans. 
Phillips. E. B. 
Ridley. Eugene. 
Robinson. R. D. 
Sivori. Tony. 
Sloan. W. B. 
Smiley. W, S. 
Spratford, J. 
Sudduth. A. G. 
Sudduth. W. S. 
Tierney. Jas. 
Turner, P. T. 
Whitson. R. R. 
Wood. S. J. 
Wood. T. F. 
Workman. C. E. 




BAYONET EXERCISE, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 



COMPANY M. 

Sheffield Clark. Captain. 

Martin Dismukes. First Lieutenant. 

Nat Gooch. Second Lieutenant. 

Noncommissioned Officers and Privates. 



Archii)a!cl. W, A. 
Baggett. A, 
Bass, G. R. 
Beauford, F. P. 
Benson. G, R. 
Bivens, J, M, 
Blair. S. F. 
Bratton. S. C. 
Chrisman. .1. M. 
Cleveland. G. W. 
Cook, Fred. 
Cordell, G. N, 



Cowan. John. 
Critz, T. L. 
Ewangcr. W. F. 
Ferrell. J. P. 
Fox, J. E. 
Freera:in. J. F. 
Freeman. B. 
French, Bristol, 
Hagler, Leslie. 
Harris, K. A. 
He:ly, T. J. 
llextrum. Chr.s, H. 



Hickey. H. B. 
Hoppes. G. A. 
Hosay. J, H. 
Hughes, G. W. 
Jacobson, J. S. 
Jones, J. A. 
Jones. R. N. 
Knapke, W. F. 
Lcdbetter. Frank, 
Lytle, W. R. 
Mackel. J. J. 
MoPeters. W. N. 
Miller. F. R. 
Neal. Natt. 
Nelson, C. A. 
Newsom, J. B. 
Pope, Geo, 
Porter, B, K. 
Prince, William, 



Ridner, Rufus, 
Riuerd, T. L, 
Riley, \V, A. 
Rodgers, A, F, 
Rutledge, L, R, 
Saunders, E, O, 
Sawyers, J, J, 
Settle, J, W, 
Scott, W, L, 
Stoutt. B. B. 
Strunk H, L, 
Sullivan, 'i'. m. 
Talley, G, T. 
Weathers, Ed. 
Wells J. 
Whitehead. T. S. 
Womac G A. 
Young. A. H. 




I GEN MILLER REVIEWING TROOPS. 



2. DRESS PARADE. 



3. BATTALION DRILL. 



REGIMENTAL ROSTER, THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT. U. S. V. 



41 




COL. W. C. SMITH AND STAFF. 

Discharged at Manila 

IN THIS LIST THE GKEATER P.\RT KE-ENLISTED, AND A NUMBER I.EKT THE PHILIPPINES FOR A TRIP 
AROUND THE WORLD. A FEW CAME ON TO SAN FRANCISCO. 



COMPANY A. 



H. 



Averill. F. L 
Ball. V. L. 
Beatty. J. E. 
Beresford, C 
Buckner, C. 
Cabrut, J. N. 
Crutchfield, E. 
Duckworth. J. T 
Fitzpatrick, J. E 
Fitzpatrick. K. 
Grizzard, B. D. 
Howery. I. 
Hodge, J. H. 



Kimball, A. L. 
Martindale. M. J. 
Mix. Harry. 
Newkirk, A. J. 
Peck. E. H. 
Penny, M. B. 
Pierce. Maurice J. 
Roberts. E. 
Smith. C. M. 
Stewart. F. 
Todd. C. S. 
Wharton, .1, H. 



COM.PANY B. 



Batts, T. N. 
Berry, C. R . .Jr. 
Bruger, H. E. 
Burns, Chas. 
Cook, R. R. 



Cowdeu. .T. W. 
Crane, L. 
Dodson, Edward. 
Grimes. .1. L. 
Glenn. W. H. 



Hurt. B. E. 
Jackson. Wm. 
Liebhart. N. H. 
McKisack. R. L. 
Morgan. J, H. 
Notgrass. C. B. 
Ormes. L. B. 
Overton. W. .1. 
Payne. Claude. 
Pirie. .J. G. 
Ray. Lovick 
Reed. W, L. 



Russell. P. F. 
Simpson. L. O. 
Skillern. R, C. 
Slaight, J. T. 
Smythe. J. M. 
Solinsky. H. 
Spurlin. Gano. 
Spencer, .1. B. 
Strong, L. P. 
Watts, W. O. 
Watts, H. C. 
Wright. F. D. 



COMPANY C. 



Allison. W. F. 
Birdwell. ,Ias. K. 
Daniels, .1. H. 
Ellis, Luke. 
Gi^rfinkle. L. 
Hail, B. M. ■ 
Hicks. .Jeff. 



.lerniaii, Jas. 
Jones. Grant. 
Martin, D. R. 
Nims. Alonzo. 
Steakley. D. L, 
Tothacer, Jas. M. 
Williams, B. 




I. CAPT. JAS. K POLK. 
2. CAPT A J. LAW. 



3 CAPT. SAM VAN LEER 

4. CAPT. R. M. MILAM. 

5. CAPT. HU B. MYERS. 



6. CAPT. L. A. CARAWAY. 

7. CAPT. GEORGE REED 



REGIMENTAL ROSTKR. THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT. U. S. V. 



43 




COMPANY F. 



LIEUT. W F COOPER. 



COMPANY D. 



Armstrong, W. F. 
Barker, John. 
Bloom, Calvin H, 
Brothers, C. L. 
Brooks. Cas. C. 
Cotfman. .lohn. 
Costner. Wm. R. 
i^rownover. J. M. 
Drake, Mark P. 
Inman, S. E. 
Kelly, W. J. 
McNeal. Chester G. 
Moore, Milton M. 



Oleson, Ole .J. 
Owen. Basil. 
Penpiugton. C. W. 
Plaskett, J. W, 
Potts. Sara T. 
Richard, Clarence. 
Saddler, P. E. 
Stanford. Walter. 
Strong, L. R. 
Voiles. .James. 
M'allace. Milton E. 
Wildes. Calvin. 



COMPANY E. 



Battle. George. 
Browder. W. C. 
Crandall. T. A. 
Delora, Tlios. 
Doyle, John. 
Fryar. R. H. 
Fuller. Felix. 
Gilnian. A. V. 
Johnson. James. 
Johnson, O. W. 



Lee. Harry. 
Lee. I. E. 
.McCord, A, L. 
Pool. L. C. 
Rookcr, C. A. 
Ryan, Chas. 
Smith, B, A. 
Thomjison, \V. 
Vifkcrs, F, 
Watson. Clyde. 



Alexander. James. 
Beaumont, H. F. 
Bruce. Wm. R. 
Campbell. A. M. 
Carson, O. H. 
Chapman, F. E. 
Collingsworth. B. F. 
Fleming. F. H. 
Gibbs, Q. D. 
Gillem. S. J. 
Gillespie. J. W. 
Gillock. R. F. 



Glase. D. L. 
Huggins, L. R. 
Kelly, C. J. 
Kimzie. A. J. 
Mann. W. C. 
Mickle, J, M. 
Rea. R. M. 
Roberts, F. O. 
Rutter. Wm. 
Samuels. J. H. 
Samuels. O. W. 
Sawyer. L. E. 



COMPANY G. 



Alexander. J. S. 
Barrett. A. M. 
Bell. Manson. 
Brothers, B, R. 
Connor. E. B. 
Finney. J. I. 
Floyd. Geo. 
Glasgow. J. T. 
Haggerty. P. P, 
Henderson, John. 
HoMer. C. A. 
Jones. T. 
Johnson, Will. 



Kuowles. J. E. 
Little, Thos. L. 
Moore, J. W. 
Osborne. W. T. 
Stephens. Henry. 
Tucker, W. H. 
Wallace, C. C. 
Waller. J. W. 
White. Horace. 
Williams, J. W. 
Wood. J. H. 
Wright, R. E. 




WAITING MARCHING ORDERS. 



REGIiMENTAL ROSTER. THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. V. 



ir. 




REVIEW AT THE PRESIDIO TENNESSEE REGIMENT PASSING GENERAL MILLER. 



COMPANY H. 



Curtis. J. 
Davidson. W. E. 
Dorris. L. C. 
Drane, Lewis. 
Eaker, Chas. 
Ellis, Thos. H. 
Evans, A. O. 
Hudson, M. J. 
Kendrick. J. C, 
Lambrecht, H. 
Mabry. Thos. 



Jr. 



McCleary, Edward. 
Miller, W. 
Moore, C. L. 
Poore. J. Z. 
Rollow, E. W. 
Smith, R. B. 
Stacker. Clay, Jr. 
Stewart, S. 
Tate. John H. 
Williamson. Logan. 
Woodhead. H. P. 



COMPANY I. 



Alexander, W. T. 
Alton, Wm. H. 
Carrlger, G. C. 
Coulter, Richard. 
Duff, J. T. 
Dye, Chas. B. 
Emory, Alex. 
Geer, Geo. 
Oeorge, Lee. 
Leach, D. P. 
Litton, Harvey. 
Llewellyn, Jas. 
Long, John W. 



Martin, W. B. 
McGinnis, W. P. 
McFadden, W. A. 
Moore, Walter. 
Moses, Jas. H. 
Mumpower, Sam. 
Newport, M. 
Orange, N. P. 
Phillips, Josiah. 
Redman, J. A. 
Scott. Pagan. 
Taylor, J. W. 
Taylor, Sherman. 



COMPANY K. 



Butler. A. J. 
Crossland, Edward. 
Davis, Edward. 
Davidson. W. M. 
Duffer, J. P. 
Pathera, J. E. 
Fox, John P. 



Garrett, Andrew. 
Hardacre, C. G. 
Hart, J. H. 
Hedge, R. M. 
Jones, S. B. 
Menos, W. S. 
Hyatt, T. Lee. 



Powers, Chas. 
Proctor, Wm. J. 
Reed. Roljert. 
Rodgers. R. L. 
Roth, Emile. 
Smalling, John. 



Tandy, Jesup S. 
Taylor, Benjamin. 
Thornburg, John P. 
Tubbs. J. C. 
WatUins. S. D. 



COMPANY L. 



Askew, R. 
Bass, R. J. 
Bowling. W. K. 
Clark, J. C. 
Costen, J. R. 
Cummins. J. D. 
David, C. R. 
Pletcher, J. L. 
Gooch, Nat. 
Grandall, Jas. 
Graves, G. L. 
Green, J. G. 
Johnson, L. E. 
Jones, J. R. 
Jones, W. G. 



Lavelle. James. 
Lucas, J. E. 
Manion, W. 
McEwen, John A., Jr. 
Morris. Robt. 
Morton. W. E. 
Nichols. J. 
Nichols, L. 
Smith, C. P. 
Smith. T. W. 
Snyder, J. R. 
Walker, R. H. 
Walker. W. J. 
White, Wm. 



Allen, G. L. 
Baggett, John. 
Butler, R, W. 
Davis. B. E. 
Decker, T. P. 
Deva'll, H. L. 
Dodson, A. J. 
Griffith, R, 
Higgs, B. C. 
Litchfield, L. O 



COMPANY M. 

Preston, W. R. 
Smith, Andrew, 
Smith, T. H. 
Stokes, Ed. 
Strunk, I. M. 
Sullivan, T. E. 
ThUioI. Joe. 
Talley, Olin. 
Taylor. J. T. 
Tiulor. J. R. 




I OFF FOR MANILA. 



2. THE TRANSPORT INDIANA RETURNING TO AMERICA. 



REGIMENTAL ROSTER, THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT, U. S. V 



47 



Others Discharged. 

In addition to those named above as having been 
discharged in the Philippines, the following, whose 
names cannot be found in the regimental roster, are 
given: 

Noncommissioned Staff — W. R. Davis. Boyd John- 
son. Arthur E. Emory. Frank A. Smith. George J. 
Smith. 

Band— L. C. Gaylord, Frank A. Wrigut. 

Company A — Jas. T, Breunning, Chas. P. Thruston. 
C. Walter Guerin. 

Company B — P. C. Seymour. Lee K. Pona, E. Alex- 
ander. 

Company E — Ed Gregory, L. P. Woodley. J. P. Da- 
vidson, O. J. Kirkland. 

Company I — W, T. James. 

Company L — J. E. Brown. Joseph Fletcher. C. B. 
Ewing. Charles Richardson. 

Company H — J. M. Rander. 

Company G — C. B. Montgomery. James D. Muse, 
Emile Hertner. Roy Johnson, V. Blakemore, E, Pow- 
ell, 

Company F — A, F. Grimes, J. F. Knapp. Chas. 
Leonard. 

Company C — C. C. Winna. 

Company M— T. L. Richards, J. Ford, E. O. Sam- 
uels, D. H. Sibbett. John Plaskett. 

Company K — Harry Johnson. R. H. McDonald, G. 
R. DufHn. John K. Zil^enheim, Wm. A. Garland, Hop- 
kins K. Ellick. 

Those who determined to make a trip around the 
world were: 

R. S. Coulter. R. C. Crutchfield. 

C. H. Stacker. M. Martindale, 

E. W. Rollow. M, J, Pierce. 

Boyd Johnson. C. L. Baker. 

J. N. Rundle, J. H. Tate, 

Y. C. Kendrick. J. N. Wharton. 

Logan Williamson and H. L. Frierson went to 
Europe via the Suez Canal 

Percy L. Jones. Captain and Assistant Surgeon, 
and R. M. Kirby-Smith, Captain and Assistant Sur- 
geon, remained in the Philippines to practice med- 
icine. 

Discharged in 1898. 

Following is the list of soldiers discharged at San 
Francisco, in October, 18ft». 

Band — Privates Hope. Duke, Lewis, Floyd, and W, 
Hugh Harris. 

Company A — Privates Luther L. Banks, Thomas 
Goodall, John H. Grey, Thomas Nixon, Nathan P. 
Harris. Patrick H. Russell. Earl P. Shoffner, Harry 
L. Scott, Fred L, Stewart, Karl Stokes, Harry Winn, 
A. L. Windle, R. W. and T nomas Woods. 

Company B — Sergt. Robert D. Compton, Privates 
Israel W. Bennett, Joseph A. Boehms, John Schap- 
man. Lenniel Cooke, Charles Goad, Nat C. Hickey, 
William Irwin, James H. Jenkins. James S. Jenkins, 
Err,est Kidwell, Robt. M. Lindsley. Walter W. Mar- 



shall. Charles Metcalfe. William Newton. Harvey A. 
Piikington. T. Albert Reilley. Henry L. Smith, Rufus 
Stokes, Martin Taylor, Daniel Ware. 

Company C — Privates William H. Birdwell, James 
Ccok, Frank Fitzgerald, William R. Harris. Luther 
Kirkpatrick. Henry Longworth, Joseph Smith, Wil- 
liam W. Robinson. 

Company D — Privates Reuben J. Brown. Ambrose 
Burger, William E. Curry, John B. Free, Felix R. 
GLbon, Henry Jones, Nelson Llewellyn, William 
Moffatt, Russell M. Sharp, Edgar B. Washburn, Mor- 
gan R. Woosnam. 

Company E — Privates Adam Diehl, Jr., P. H. Far- 
rell. J. W. Moore, Wm. R. Jenkins, R. M. Samuels, 
Jr., Fred J. Sitzler, James Steincamp. 

Company F — Privates Marion C. Beatty. Charles 
Bcnville. Hal. Ledford. Alexander R. McCorkle, 
Charites T. Neil, James S. Parker, Felix Smith, 
Raphael S. Wright. 

Company G — Corporals J. F. Manning and Ala 
Sims, Privates Lee Able, Marion J. Barnett, H. Clay 
Craig. John F. Gibson, John Q. Lewis. Thos. B. Ma- 
son, Walter McBride, Carl B. Montgomery. Lawrence 
B. Sauford, Alexander Sheppard, Thomas J. Smart, 
Smith Stewart, Austin Talley. Robert C. Wor.haim, 
J. Ewing Wright. 

Company H — Corporal Howard Bland, and Pri- 
vates Jams H. Adkits, George H. Benson, Jackson 
Beymer, Walter Chester, James Claypool, William 
P, Ewell, Richard V, Gossett, Joseph Gunter, Charles 
Hamatty, Walton Hurst, John W. Jackson, Albert G, 
Jenkins, Horace G. Saunderson, Alexander Sheppard, 
Gus Summer, John D. Williams, George W. Waller. 

Company I — Privates Perry Byrd, James L. Col- 
lins, Charles F. Hoard, Albert W, Larue, George W. 
Larue, Jesse D. Lewis. James L. Lovelace, John Mus- 
covalley, Millard F. Newport. John S. Robertson, 
Porter Sellars, Gilbert Sexton, William Z. Sharp, 
Engine Travis, Paul G. White. Gaines Whitecotton. 

Company K — Privates Albert E. Cudworth, Wil- 
liam W. Cox, John Dean, Edward H. England, Henry 
Ferguson, Lawson C. Guun, Mann G. Gunn, Thomas 
W. Gunn. William R. Halsey. Frank W. Leyley, Law- 
rence B. Nichols, and Walter Walling. 

Company L — Sergt. Gideon Fields, Corporals John 
R. Aylor, William M. Petty, and Thomas P. Poe, 
Privates William L. Bailey, Edward J. Dougherty, 
John H. Douglass, James M. Douglass, George Dun- 
can, William F. Gaughey, Horace McBee, William H. 
McCoy, Robt, L. McKinney. Edward L. Moss, George 
Phillips, Charles Post, Eugene Whitson. 

Company M— Sergt. John B. Bright. Corporal Chas. 
A. Clegg, Privates L. Gratton Bright. Hugh E. Bligh, 
William F. Casey, John B, Cothran, Little B. Cotton, 
T Fred Cook. Milton B. Davidson, Ready Donoho, 
George E. Edwards, George K. Fletcher, Martin L. 
Holt. James W. McClanahan, John McKinney, Jas. 
C. McNatt, Richard Miles, Christopher Nielson, Finis 
Scutherland, Robert L. Todd, Daniel E, Vaugh, John 
S. Weidor. and l^illicont Wiiite. 




_l 
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Uhc S)ca& 



|lird 



.IdHN S. LUTTItEI.I., 
PriViLte — L'uniimny G. Naslnille. May n. 1S38. 

Luther Gates, 

Priviiti- — Coiiipiiny G. Nu^hvill.•, .Imie 10. 1S9». 

John Hamilton, 

I'rivate — Company D, San Friuicibro. .luiie 30. 1898. 

William W. KiN(i, 

Private — Company E, San Ki-ani-isi-o, July 2. 1898. 

Charles D. Gamble, 

Private — ronipauy A, Sau KranciM-o. .lul.\ 1-. 1898. 

Charles A. Kanadv, 

Private —t'onii>any L, San Francisco. J ul.\ 12, 1898. 

Zeb Stafford, 

Private — Company C, San Francisco. July 15. 1898. 

James E. Stafford, 

Private — Company C, San Francisco. July 21. 1898. 

Joseph L. Baker, 

Private — Company B, San Francisco. July 23, 1898. 

Shelton Irving. 

Private — Company E. San Francisco, .luly 29. 1898. 

Percy B. Wiiittaker, 

Private — Company B, San Francisco. August 12, 1898. 

James MiTriiELL. 

Private— Company C. San Francisco. August 16. 1898. 

\\'ili.tam a. Uimpass, 

Private — ('onipan.'. D. San Francisco, Octoljer 4. 1898. 

Claude Pavne, 

Private — Company B. 



Benjamin' McConnell, 

Private— C"mpariy B. Haley, Tenn., on furlough. October 
13, 1898. 



Xeal Mathews. 

Private — Company M. San Francisco. - 



-, 1898. 



A. B. McClain, 

Private — Company G. Manila, January 11, 1899. 

John A. Meyers. 

Private — Conjpany H. Manila. January 20. 1899. 

William C Smith. 

Colonel — Manila (died on the battlefield), February .5. 1899. 

James A. Garvey, 

Private — Company A. Manila, Februarys, 1899. 

Lewis J. Leland, 

Chaplain — III. ilo. Isle of Panay. February IS. 1899. 

James V. Morris, 

Private- Company M. Iloilo. February 18. 1899. 

Fred J. Sitzler. 

Private — Company E. Ridge Post. Tenn.. M.irch 12. IH99. 

Joseph ]j. Walker, 

Corporal — Company B. Manila. March IT. 1899. 

William H. Wallace, 

Private— Company L, Manila, March 20. 1899. 

Orville Mercer, 

Private — Company — , Iloilo, August 30. 1899. 

William Creelman, 

Private — Comnany li. Iloilo. September 2. 1899. 

Frank F. McNeal, 

Private — Corapany I), San Francisco, November 11, 1898. 



billed 



Walter M. Parrish. LirriEN B. Price, 

Private — Company C. by accident. Iloilo, March 19, 1899. Corporal -Company A, by accident, Cebu, September 12 

1899. 

James C. Bullinoton, 

Corporal- Company F, in actioo, Iloilo, September IS. 1899. 






( r-M 




1 



( 

I 







OUR BOYS. 



(THE FIRST TENNESSEE REGIMENT. 



In among-st the city's bustle, out among-st the rural ways, 
These, "our boys," passed on unnoticed, in the uneventful days. 
Peace held sway and, all untroubled, half forgot that war's alarm 
Mig-ht yet roar about her pathway with the voices of the storm. 

But there came a day when insult was accorded to the flag-; 
As the tocsin rang out shrilly, who would recreant prove or lag? 
True there hovered in the distance prospects of a direful fate — 
But our hero-sons responded, fearless, stalwart, and elate ! 

Let us render them the homage that the regiment earned well 
Through the nights of anxious waiting, through the days of shot and 

shell. 
Liberty is not in danger whatsoever threat annoys. 
Long as she can have such cli.inipidiis as she has to-day, "our boys!" 



(51) 







I. WAITING THE TRAIN FOR SAN FRANCISCO 



^T CHERJKEE PARK NEAR NASHVILLE. JUNE lO. 1898. 



COMMITTEES 



GENERAL COMMITTEE ON ARRANGEMENTS 
AND RECEPTION. 

M. T. Bryan. Chairman; K. A. H.aiey. Sec -eta y: 
John Allison, Tnlly Biown, S. .A.. Champion, G. H. 
Baskette, .John D. Anderson, E. C. I.ewis, Patton 
Cheatham, Will Cummins. M. F. Cockrill, .Joe 
Warner, Dr. John A, Currey, Lytton Taylor. L, R. 
Eastman, Andrew Milam, Dr. Nat Gooch. Dr. R. E. 
Fort, Capt, George Hagar. Capt. W. R. Garrett. Capt. 
West Morton. M. B. Pilcher. Wm. Stewart, Oliver 
Timothy, .James L. Demoville. George S. Kinney, 
Theo. Cooley. Rev. Ira Landrith. Rev. .J. I. Vance. 
C. S. Caldwell. W. L. Dudley. A. D. Wharton, W, K, 
Fhillips, John Hitchcock, Jacob Geiger, John Caruth- 
ers, John H. Polk. James Crutchfield. Thomas Good- 
all, B. J. McCarthy. H. W. Buttorff. Jos. R. West, Rev. 
Isadora Lewinthal, Rev. Dr. Ellis, Capt, Hutcheson. 
John C. Brown, Capt. Kramer. Jordan Stokes. R. L, 
Morris. C. A. Sharenberger, James S. Glenn. Firman 
Smith. W. G. Sadler, John P. JJickman. Prof. John 
L. Wright. Dr. Black. John C, Ferriss, Prof. W. C. 
Kilvington, W. A. Cheatham, A. V. S. Lindsley, Jas. 
Trimble. Gen. G. P. Thruston. J. W. Bonner, John W. 
Childress, J. M. Anderson, Dr. J. W. Maddin. Jr., 
Gen. H. C. Lamb, Capt. A. J. Harris, Dr. R. A. Halley, 
John H. DeWitt, C. C. Trabue, Gen, W. H. Jackson. 
Dr. Charles Johnson, T. P. Calhoun, Dr. R. Stone- 
slreet. Chief Henry Curran, Percy Kinnaird. L. B. 
Fite, A. V. Goodpasture. Dr. W. J. Morrison. Capt. 
H. J. Cheny, E. R. Richardson. John W^. Hunter. Jos. 
S. Carols, A. W. Wills, Dr. D. F. Banks, Tim John- 
sor.. Will B. Myers, O. C. Cunningham, Dr. D. H. 
Price. John M. Sperry. Gen. Charles Sykes, C. L. Rid- 
ley, T. M. Gaines, Henry Tanksley. B. J. Hodge, W. 
T. Osborne. Maj. Jo Vaulx. Baxter Smith. Nathan 
Cohn, M. S. Lebeck, Samuel Berger, B. B, Allen, L. 
H. Geny, T. O. Morris. C. H, Sanders, J. M. S, 
Pettitt. W. W. Smith. J. G. Summitt, O. G, Hille, G. 
W. W. Sweeney, H. M. Doak. \V. W. Knox, Dr. W. L. 
Dismukes, Jos. Lindauer, R. A. Henry. J. Matt. Wil- 
liams, Dr. R. L. C. White, Wm. J. Kwing. J. Taylor 
Stratton, Sam Newsom, Di-. A. B. Bradfonl. Dr. F. H. 
Compton, Dr, John B, Talbot. James Grundy, H. M. 
Meeks, Wm. Gerst. George A. Weber, J, W. Biker. 
Tip Gamble. Adam Diehl. George W. Fall. (Jilford 

( 



Dudley, Reau Folk. Henry Morrow, J. L. McWhorter, 
J. H. McPhail. Jesse W. Thomas. Dr. Marvin McFer- 
riii. W. N. Bilbo. George McWhirter, B. H. Beazley, 
C. K. C. Wheeling, B. F. Moore. James Ryan. George 
H. Moore Sr.. Edwin A. Price, Dr. Thomas R. New- 
mc.n, W. W. Page. Dr. W. T. Harwell, Wyman Reed, 
H. B. Buckner. Robert Curry. Charles Eastman. Jr., 
Di. W. H. Halbert. Pat Griffin. W. T. Hardison. W. J. 
Vi.rley. AV. D. Mille;-. J. B. OBryan. Gov. Benton Mc- 
Millin. 

Mesdames H. B. Buckner. Jas. K. Polk, E. E. 
Hoss, A. C. Gillem, Nat Gooch, John J. Vertrees, H. 
C. Beaumont, M. S. Cockrill. G. P. Rose. W. H. Bum- 
pass. M, B. Pilcher. W. G. Sadler. J. W. Allen, Elmer 
Bruce. D, R. Dorris. R. G. Throne. John H. Baskette, 
J M. Head, John C. Gaut, John M. Gaut, John W, 
Childress, J. S. Pilcher, L. R, Campbell, H, Solin 
sky, M, S. I^ebeck, John W. McAlister. A. M. Shook 
W. J. Morrison. Mary P. McGuire. G. W. Gilford 
E C. .Andrews. Wm. Hume, J. K. Rains. Alice Ridley 
W. J. McMurray. Andrew Milam. Wesley Mouon: 
Will Minchin, A. J. Laws. S. W. Edwards, J. B. Han- 
cock, A. H. Robinson. W. K. Black, S. A. Champion 
Percy Warner. John R. Frizzell. Spencer McHenry 
W. L. Granbery, Hamilton Parkes. J. H. Acklin, John 
H. Reeves. Claude Street. Ed Stahlman. W. H, Mitch- 
ell. Edward McNeely, Andrew Price, Frank Harde- 
man, A. D. Marks. Ittie Kinney Reno, Berry Bayless, 
M. T. Polk. Corinne G. Eastman, Wm. Simmons, 
Jesse R. Norton, Fred Cummins. Irene Sloan, Abbie 
Reed, Ed Cooper, Alice Branch, Dan Kinney, W. D. 
Haggard. Jr. 

Misses Mary Demoville, Ella Brown, Medora Cheat- 
ham, Ada Morrow. Idella Sawrie, Eunice Polk, Wilola 
McCord. Mary Moore, -May Burton, Mary Hoss, Lou- 
ise Kali, Cora Hays. May Sadler, Addie Williamson, 
L. Graff Wies, Louise Bransford. Alice Rains. Louise 
MtJlonry, Willie Fall, Mary Dibrell. Willie Fite, Es- 
telle Shook. Zara Ruhm, Odiline McCarthy, Louise 
Hill. May Grantland, Cornelia Pearcy, Virginia L. 
Briggs, Nannie Dudley Pilcher. Elsie Briggs, Mollie 
C'aiborne, Lucy Eastman, .Addie Douglas, Sammie 
Ki ith. Ada Rice. Elizalieth Price, Lizzie Atchison, 
Mary Mitchell, Mary E, Williams. Susie Luck. Ma- 
mie L. Pierce. Felicia Porter, Cora Hager. Sadie 
Kinney, Elizabeth Clark. 



r,3) 




m^mm^^^f^sM^M^m^^M^^ 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE REOIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



55 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

John D. Anderson, Chairman; R. A. Halley. Sec- 
retary; E. C. Lewis. G. H. Baskette, Dr. W. L. Dud- 
ley. H. M. Brennecke, Firman Smith, W. T. Hardison. 
Maj. W. H. Morton, E. R. Richardson. Jo Frank. 
Tully Brown. Mrs. G. P. Rose, Mrs. M. T. Polk. Mrs. 
H. B. Buckner, Mrs. E. C. Andrews. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Maj. E. C. Lewis. Chairman; Maj. J. W. Thomas. 

E. C Andrews, G. N. Tillman, R. M. Dudley. L. K. 
Hart, Dr. J. Y. Crawford, N. D. Malone, W. D. With- 
erspoon. Lee Brock, Jacoh Geiger, G. M. Neely. Rob- 
ert Carmack. Edgar Jones, James B. Carr. Joseph 
Frank, John Ruhm, Sr., P. A. Smith, W. C. Dibrell, 

F. P. MeWhirter, Ike Johnson, John J. McCann. Wil- 
liam Litterer. Dr. J. B. Murrey. Andrew Price. Edwin 
M. Barnes, Robert L. Campbell, Jo. M. Warren. J. 
W. Johnson, A. W. Wills. Dr. Nat Gooch, B. J. Mc- 
Carthy. John P. Hickman, W. B. Bayless. Dr. W. B. 
Lee, A. B. Anderson, T. O. Morris. Mrs. G. P. Rose. 

COMMITTEE TO RECEIVE THE REGIMENT AT 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

J W. Gaines, Chairman; H. B. Buckner, B. J. Mc- 
Carthy, Mrs. Robert E. Martin. P. M. Gritnn. Miss 
Eunice Murphy, Miss Elizabeth Kirby. Mrs. Elmer 
L. Bruce, Mrs. J. H. Andrews, Mrs. Alvin C. Gillem, 
Mrs. Alice M. Branch, Miss Mary E. Warmack, Mrs. 
Nathaniel Gooch. Miss Mary Hill Cockrill, Mrs. R. B. 
Buckner, Mrs. Mary C. Dorris, George T. Halley, Mrs. 
H. F. Beaumont, Mrs. M. T. Polk, Mrs. James K. Polk, 
Charles H. Johnson, Nashville; James A. Cheatham, 
Miss Kathleen O'Brien, Miss Queen. Mrs. C. W. 
Bailey, Mrs. Clay Stacker, Mrs. C. W. Beaumont, 
Miss Louise Higgle, Cave Johnson, Clarksville; Mrs. 
Bullock, Franklin: Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Frierson, Co 
lumbia; J. S. Chandler, Hermitage; Finis Ewing, 
Jr.. Hampton Station; Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Brandon, 
Dover; W. A. McGraw, Fort Henry: Robert L. Mor- 
ris, Paris; Mrs. T. M. McMillin, Hopkinsville; Mrs. 
John G. Magnire, McMinnville. 

EMPLOYMENT COMMITTEE. 

E. C. Andrews. Chairman: Capt. A. J. Harris. Chas 
H. Sanders, N. D. Malone, B. J. McCarthy. W. M 
Cassetty, J. B. Carr, Theodore Cooley. R. A. Halley 
C. S. Caldwell, Jo B. Morgan, W. C. Collier. Will Cum 
mins, Joseph Lindauer, A. V. Gooilpasturo, John B 
Ransom, Paul Eldridge, Byrd Douglas, E. D. \Vr<'nne 



Robert Lusk. W. Dudley Gale. R. P. Webb, Hugh K. 
Alderson, Alex Hunter, W. P. Rutland, G. W. Bran- 
don. L. B. Fite, G. M. Neely. T. B. Dallas, Mrs. E. C. 
Andrews, Mrs. G. P. Rose, Mrs. Thomas Pettus, Mrs. 
E E. Hoss, Mrs. J. C. Gaut, Mrs. M. B. Pilcher, Mrs. 
L. L. Terry, Mrs. J. K. Rains. 

INVITATION COMMITTEE. 

Hon. J. M. Head. Chairman: H. M. Brennecke, G. 
N. Tillman. E A. Price. L. R. Eastman, J. W. 
Gaines. John N. Sperry, John Caruthers, A. D. Marks, 
A. W. Wills. 

PROGRAMME COMMITTEE. 

Dr. W L. Dudley, Chairman; G. H. Baskette, Dr. 
R. L. C. White, S. A. Champion. J. W. Thomas, E. C. 
Lewis, John D. Anderson. J. M. Head, Firman Smith, 
John C. Brown, W. R. Garrett. Theo. Cooley, H. M. 
Brennecke, Mrs. M. T. Polk, Mrs. Elmer Bruce, Mrs. 

E. C. Andrews, J. W. Gaines, G. P. Thruston, Gov. 
Benton McMillin, W. T. Hardison, John Allison, W. 
J. Varley, Tully Brown, M. S. Cockrill, Geo. F. Hager, 
W. H. Morton, Capt. W. A. T. Kramer, W. H. Morton, 
W. D. Miller, Mrs. Mary C. Dorris, Mrs. Berry Bay- 
less. 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE. 

John W. Thomas, Chairman; John D. Anderson, 
A. W. Wills, H. M, Brennecke. John P. Hickman. M. 
S. Cockrill. H. W. Buttorff. E. R. Richardson, Geo. 
S. Kinney. John Caruthers. Percy Kinnaird, Jesse W. 
Thomas. Charles Sykes, Charles H. Sanders. Russell 
O. Bean. 

MILITARY COMMITTEE. 

Capt. W. R. Garrett, Chairman; Capt. Geo. F. Ha- 
ger. Capt. W. H. Morton. Capt. M. B. Pilcher, Col. 
Baxter Smith. Capt. Joe B. OBryan, Capt. W. B. Wal- 
ton, Col. Thos. L. Claiborne, W. H. Bowman, Gen. 
H. C. Lamb. Capt. W. A. T. Kramer, uol. Hutchinson, 
Capt. B. G. Wood. 

DECORATION COMMITTEE. 

H. M. Brennecke, Chairman; O. J. Timothy, Jas. 
L. Demoville. Jo Frank, R. T. Quarles. Joe Buford, 
C. W. Rives, Joe M. Warren, John P. Hickman, Chas. 
Tritchler, Mrs. John J. Vertrees, Mrs. M. B. Pilcher, 
Mrs. S. A. Champion, Mrs. Ittie Kinney Reno, Mrs. 

F. L. Blum, Miss Ella Brown, Miss Medora McAlis- 
tcr. Miss Idella Sawrie, Miss Mary Dibrell, Miss Liz- 
zie Atchison, Miss Addie Douglass. 




MAJOR AND SURGEON R A BARR 



THE FIRST TENNESSEE EEGIMENT, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS. 



57 



MUSIC COMMITTEE. 

Firman Smith. Chairman: Judge J. W. Bonner, W. 
C. Kilvington. George McWhirter, John H. DeWitt, 
Alfred Levine. J. W. Johnson. Frank Henniger, Leon 
F. Miller, Mrs. W. D. Haggard. Jr., Mrs. L. R. Camp 
bell. Mrs. M. S. Lebeck, Miss Mary Demoville, Miss 
Pri'die Polk, Miss Elizabeth Price, Miss Ada Morrow, 
Miss Nannie Dudley Pilcher, Miss Susie Porterfieid. 

ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE. 

S. A. Champion, Chairman; Judge J. M. Anderson. 
Dr. Rufus Fort, Capt. A. J. Harris, T. O. Morris. Na- 
than Cohn, John Hitchcock, Dr. George H. Price, 
Wm. Gerst, E. A. Price, Thos. J. Tyne, Andrew Mi- 
lam John A. Demoville, B. F. Moore, Tip Gamble, 
J. W. Baker. 



PRINTING COMMi i TEE. 

G. H. Baskette, Chairman; Rev. Ira Landrith. 
Reau Folk, A, V. S. Lindsley, John W. Hunter. R. A. 
Henry, H. M. Meeks, Thomas Goodall. 

BADGE COMMITTEE. 

Theo. Cooley, Chairman; A. D. Wharton, Dr. W. 
A. Cheatham, Capt. H. J. Cheny, Samuel Burger, J. 
Matt Williams. Charles Eastman, Jr., A. G, Brandon. 

SOUVENIR PROGRAMME COMMITTEE. 

G. H. Baskette, Chairman; E. C. Lewis, Jo Frank, 
compiler and editor. Will T. Hale. 

CLARKSVILLE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



CARRIAGE COMMITTEE. 



Julian F. Gracey. Chairman; Judge C. H. Bailey, 
Maj. Clay Stacker, Capt. A. F. Smith, T. D. Lockett, 
John C. Brown. Chairman: James A. Ryan, James H. T. Drane. George Perkins. Mrs. A. F. Smith, Mrs. 
Grundy. M. S. Lebeck. Robert Currey, O. G. Hille. George Wartiekl. Mrs. Clay Stacker. 




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A Royal Home Welcoming 



TO THE 



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^l^Castner-Knott Dry Goods Co. 

RETAILERS TO THE ENTIRE SOUTH, 



SUMMER STKHET 



NASiniLLE, THXX. 



SUMMER STREE1 



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JNO S LEWIS, Sscf. 



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The Leading Southern Brewery 




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With its Crown of Purity and its Health and 
Strength-g-iving- properties, makes it the 
Finest and most dolicious Hop Beverage in 
Christendom to-day '■ 



n you cannot get Gerst Bottled Beer from 
your Dealer, write us for Price. 



SHIPPED TO ALL PARTS 
OF THE COUNTRY. 



ALL TIIL KXGKAVIXGS 

IN THIS PriiLICATION 
WKKK MADK BY 

The SoiitluM-n I^nLi:ra\in,i;- Co., 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




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Yours TRULY, Wm. LOVEMAN. 

Welcome, mothers, sisters, sweetheart-^ of these heroes into 
our Millinery Emporium, where Hiyh-L'rade Trimmed Hats, at 
very low prices, can be found. Give us a call. 

M. B. LOVEMAN & CO., 
TELEPHONE 3126-2. 310 Union St.. Near College St. 




Vanderbilt University. : /v^QONEY SCMOOL 



Academic. Engineering. Medical. Law. Dental. 
Biblical and Pharmaceutical Departments. 

Unexcelled Equipment in e;ioh Department. 

Courses in Civil. Electrical. Mechanical and Mininj^ 
Eng'ineering' with complete shops and laboratories. 
For full information, address 

WiLs Williams, Bursar, 

Nashville, Tennessee. 



PREPARES BOYS 
FOR .... 




COLLEGE OR 
ERSITY 



W. D. MOONEY, Principal, 

FRANKLIN, TENN. 




The Returning Soldier Boys ^ 



ais 



Will likely want to " fix up" for their best girls. 

They will find the Pennsylvania Hat Co. head- 
quarters for Hats and Fine Furnishing Goods nt moder- 
ate prices. Our line of Old Hickory Soft and Stiff Hats 
are the best $;i.l)0 hats in the country. Our $1.00, 
$1.50 and $-2.0() hats for men, and .50 cents and $!.00 
hat for boys can't be equaled anywhere at our 



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prices. 



PENNSYLVANIA HAT CO., 

520 Union 




Street, 



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CHERRY ST., Near Maxwell House, 



-22SBa'"^NASHVILLE, TENN. 



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Electric Light & Power Co. 



F. S. HAMBLETON. Prcsidetil. E. G. CONNBTTE, General A/anager. 

E. C. LEWIS, Vice Presiiicnl. N. P. YEATMAN, Secrelary and Treasurer. 







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ELECTRIC roWER AM) LIGHTS LOR ALL LURE 



OFFICE, WILLCOX BUILDING, 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DECORATIONS A SPECIALTY. 



Telephonh 901 



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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



013 789 781 7